Feeds

Chinese web firms sue search giant Baidu for video piracy

But MPAA NOT joining copyright violations claim

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Updated A group of Chinese web and film companies have banded together to take search giant Baidu to court over allegations of video piracy.

The group, which includes companies like Tencent Holdings, Sohu.com and Youku Tudou, call themselves the Joint Action Against Online Video Piracy in China. They are looking for 300 million yuan ($49.2m, £30.8m) in damages from Baidu and Shenzhen-based software company QVOD for copyright infringement.

They said that Baidu and other companies had been using an automated process to gather content owned by other firms, Reuters, The Wall Street Journal and others have reported. Baidu also linked to sites that hosted pirated content, they claimed.

Baidu said that it uses an automatic filter to search out illegal content and has a team that works 24 hours a day to process any complaints. The Chinese search giant said it was committed to fighting online piracy. Software firm QVOD said that it was only a video player, and argued it wasn’t providing any content.

But the group said that efforts to negotiate with Baidu hadn’t been successful and claimed the company had said it wouldn’t agree to rules on violating copyright unless QVOD did the same.

"We can't continue to compete in the situation because law-abiding people can't survive in a place where robbers and thieves rampage," Charles Zhang, chief executive of Sohu.Com, told a news conference today. ®

Update

A previous version of this story said the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) was also taking legal action against Baidu, alongside the Chinese companies. This is not the case. An MPAA Asia Pacific spokesman said: “The MPA understands that some of China’s leading online video providers, including Youku Tudou, Sohu, Tencent and LeTV.com, have filed law suits against Baidu. Urgent action is needed to prevent large scale online infringement of film and television content in China.”

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign
Claim of tapped undersea cable refuted by Kiwi PM as Kim claims extradition plot
Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC
And ISPs should nab 'em on our behalf
Former Bitcoin Foundation chair pleads guilty to money-laundering charge
Charlie Shrem plea deal could still get him five YEARS in chokey
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.