Feeds

Red Hat halves prices, blackens European skies with OpenShift PaaS

14 new countries get commercial support for PaaS

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Red Hat has halved the cost of IT on its OpenShift platform cloud engine and expanded commercial support to cover 14 Eurozone countries.

The upgrades to OpenShift were announced by the company on Monday to coincide with Amazon Web Services's "re:Invent" cloud show in Las Vegas.

It sees the company slather the commercial "silver tier" offering across 14 countries which have adopted the euro as their currency, including Greece, Poland, Bulgaria, Latvia, Cyprus, and others. At the time of writing, Red Hat had not let us know whether the PaaS had been buffed with language localisation.

OpenShift is a platform-as-a-service from Red Hat. A platform generally presents one or several language-specific runtimes to a developer, who can write applications whose infrastructure is provisioned, deployed, and managed automatically. The platform supports Java, Ruby, PHP, Node.js, Python and Perl.

It requires less management than an app built out of infrastructure-as-a-service resources, but tends to cost more and grant the developer less control.

OpenShift competes with as-a-service products like Heroku, Google App Engine, Windows Azure, EngineYard, and Active State, and locally deployable platform services such as big kahuna Cloud Foundry as well as minnows like Apprenda.

Like rival Heroku (owned by Salesforce), OpenShift's public platform-as-a-service floats on top of Amazon's cloud on a sea of mostly "m1" instances hosted in the US EAST data center hub.

This infrastructure is covered with Red Hat SELinux software and middleware, netted together, and exposed to the end user as "gears", which is marketing jargon a term for a collection of resources that lash together storage, compute, networking, OS, and middleware, then exposed as a multi-tenant runtime.

Red Hat has cut the prices of these gears by as much as 50 per cent, with a small "gear" (512MB memory, 1GB storage) now costing $0.02 per hour, and a new "Large" class (with 2GB of memory) costing $0.10 per hour. This compares with $0.05 per hour for a Heroku "Dyno", with 512MB of RAM.

Though OpenShift is strategically important for Red Hat as the Linux company tries to gain a foothold in cloud services, the amount of business it actually does is difficult to work out: Red Hat could give us no numbers, nor could rivals like Cloud Foundry or Engine Yard.

The new pricing comes into effect immediately, and expanded country support will be available in December 2013. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
Stop the IoT revolution! We need to figure out packet sizes first
Researchers test 802.15.4 and find we know nuh-think! about large scale sensor network ops
Turnbull should spare us all airline-magazine-grade cloud hype
Box-hugger is not a dirty word, Minister. Box-huggers make the cloud WORK
SanDisk vows: We'll have a 16TB SSD WHOPPER by 2016
Flash WORM has a serious use for archived photos and videos
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
prev story

Whitepapers

Free virtual appliance for wire data analytics
The ExtraHop Discovery Edition is a free virtual appliance will help you to discover the performance of your applications across the network, web, VDI, database, and storage tiers.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Business security measures using SSL
Examines the major types of threats to information security that businesses face today and the techniques for mitigating those threats.