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'F-CK YOU GOOGLE+' ukelele missy scoops BIG WAD of $$ - for Google

Astonishing media coup as ad giant manages to monetise HATE

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Update A futile attempt to convince Google to reverse its decision to lock its ID-tracking, data-mining Google+ product into YouTube comments has helped to generate more ad revenue on the vid-sharing site.

A sweary, well-spoken young woman from Essex has had more than half a million hits on a YouTube video she posted just two days ago in which she sings a twee song entitled "Fuck You, Google+" accompanied by a guitar*.

It comes after one of the original creators of YouTube, Jawed Karim, apparently complained about having to sign in to Google+ to leave a comment below clips on the site.

Google confirmed in September that it was in the process of integrating Google+ into YouTube in a clear move to satisfy admen. At the time, the company claimed it was tailoring YouTube comments to be more "relevant" to its users.

But some netizens of the service seem to disagree.

An online petition has been signed by thousands of YouTubers who are unhappy with the switch.

Google+ requires users to have a public profile across Mountain View's massive online estate to allow them to be tracked around the web for Google to better target ads for them.

"Fuck you, Google+, your website can get fucked", sings Emma Blackery, who - at time of writing - had collected 680,491 hits over the past 48 hours on YouTube.

Youtube Video

Meanwhile a petition protesting against the Google+ mission-creep has garnered more than 80,000 signatures online.

Google did not immediately respond to The Register's request for comment on this story. ®

Updated to Add

However Ms Blackery did feel moved to contact us via the medium of Twitter, pointing out that Google scooped a measly 45 per cent of the money resulting from her video. She gets the rest under the terms of her partnership with the advertising goliath. The facts rather speak for themselves on this.

*She adds that her instrument is a ukelele, objecting to our description of it as a guitar. As does another Twit going by the moniker "phandom wank socks" who writes "she earns money off it so she wins Ps it's a ukulele dick".

We note that dictionaries including Merriam-Webster and the OED define the uke as being a type of guitar. -Ed

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