Feeds

Apple kicks iStuff-sniffer out of App Store

Fruity fans have got to work for their iFix

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Apple has banned an app that allows fanbois to work out which stores have stocks of the latest iPads and iPhones.

In a seemingly self-defeating move, the fruity firm wrote to Apple Tracker developer Mordy Tikotzky to say his app was no longer welcome in Apple world.

He immediately removed the app, which collected publicly available inventory info from Apple, and posted the following statement on his website:

I've decided to turn off the site. I'm not doing this because I want to, but rather because I received a DMCA takedown notice from Apple.

I'm not really interested in picking a fight with apple so I guess it's time to just say good bye.

Before I go though I just wanted to says thanks to all of you for the nice comments and emails that you've sent in the last few weeks. It was fun while it lasted.

However, it may be pertinent to say that Apple did not actually invoke the Digital Millennium Copyright Act in its letter, which it merely called a "takedown notice".

Apple alleged in the note that the app had violated its terms of use by scraping information from the tech titan's website.

In a letter to Tikotzky, Apple quoted a section of its own ToU, stating:

You may not use any “deep-link”, “page-scrape”, “robot”, “spider” or other automatic device, program, algorithm or methodology, or any similar or equivalent manual process, to access, acquire, copy or monitor any portion of the Site or any Content, or in any way reproduce or circumvent the navigational structure or presentation of the Site or any Content, to obtain or attempt to obtain any materials, documents or information through any means not purposely made available through the Site. Apple reserves the right to bar any such activity.

If you wish to check stock availability in American Apple stores, you can always look on the firm's website. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
China: You, Microsoft. Office-Windows 'compatibility'. You have 20 days to explain
Told to cough up more details as antitrust probe goes deeper
Windows 7 settles as Windows XP use finally starts to slip … a bit
And at the back of the field, Windows 8.1 is sprinting away from Windows 8
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?