Feeds

Hand over the goodies, Brazil tells Chocolate Factory

StreetView legal roadshow out for one more tour

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Google has until the end of this week to hand over information collected by its StreetView vehicles in Brazil.

In a judgement published Thursday November 7, a federal district court judge has agreed with the country's IBDI (Institute of Computer Policy and Rights) that the Chocolate Factory should hand the court private data collected by its StreetView vehicles in that country.

The decision confirms a July case that made a similar order. Google has opposed handing over the data on the basis that there is no relevant legislation in Brazil, but Judge Carla Patricia Friar Nogueira Lopes said passages in the country's constitution covering the protection of privacy are sufficient to allow the order to be stand.

According to El Globo (and Google Translate), by the end of this week, Google will have to hand over the data, or be liable for daily fines of 100,000 Brazilian Reals, up to a maximum of R1 million (about $US430,000 on the current exchange rate).

The IBDI wants the data to determine whether Google has been over-indulging in its data collection. If the data demonstrates mass data-collection by Google (including over-slurping open WiFi hotspots), the institute hopes to launch a class-action lawsuit.

As in other countries, Google has long ago pulled the WiFi slurping software from its StreetView vehicles, and told the court the data wasn't used in its products or services.

Brazil is planning legislation, dubbed Marco Civil de Internet, that would provide a civil rights framework for that country's Internet users. The legislation has been criticised by Google and Facebook for its requirement that data be stored within Brazil's borders rather than being shipped back to US data centres.

The country has already made it mandatory that government e-mail systems have to use open source software and store their data on-premises. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.