Feeds

Horny lovers FOSSILISED in steamy RUMPY-PUMPY session 156m yrs ago

Luckless insects favoured missionary position

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Two horny beasts have been caught shagging in the missionary position - 165 million years after they started.

Chinese scientists found a fossil of two froghopper insects in the middle of what newspapers might euphemistically term a "sex act".

The sweethearts were killed by poisonous gas as they went at it, before sinking to the bottom of a lake and becoming covered by layers of ash and sediment.

They then ended up in a fossil collection, before being rediscovered by a team from Capital Normal University.

"This one is so rare,” said Chungkun Shih, a professor at the uni and co-author of a paper discussing the find. Shih has examined more "more than half a million fossils," but has never before seen two insects bonking.

The two love bugs were having sex in the same way that froghoppers still do it: in a belly to belly stance that most humans would call the missionary position.

In a bid to explain why froghoppers still prefer this rather staid position, as opposed to reverse cowgirl or the wheelbarrow, Dr Shih said: “This works. They don’t need to change."

About 33 examples of copulating insect fossils have been dug up. Until now, the oldest was two lustful midges who were immortalised in Lebanese amber for 135 million years.

The latest creepy crawlies were found in a bed of ancient beasts including feathered dinosaurs. There is a chance that the couple were entombed together and were pushed into position by the pressure of sediment. But who wants to believe that?

A report into the findings was written by Shu Li, Chungkun Shih, Chen Wang, Hong Pang and Dong Ren. It is called Forever Love: The Hitherto Earliest Record of Copulating Insects from the Middle Jurassic of China and was published in the journal PLOS One. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Gigantic toothless 'DRAGONS' dominated Earth's early skies
Gummy pterosaurs outlived toothy competitors
Boffins ID freakish spine-smothered prehistoric critter: The CLAW gave it away
Bizarre-looking creature actually related to velvet worms
CRR-CRRRK, beep, beep: Mars space truck backs out of slippery sand trap
Curiosity finds new drilling target after course correction
'Leccy racer whacks petrols in Oz race
ELMOFO rakes in two wins in sanctioned race
Astronomers scramble for obs on new comet
Amateur gets fifth confirmed discovery
Boffins build CYBORG-MOTHRA but not for evil: For search & rescue
This tiny bio-bot will chew through your clothes then save your life
Vulture 2 takes a battering in 100km/h test run
Still in one piece, but we're going to need MORE POWER
What does a flashmob of 1,024 robots look like? Just like this
Sorry, Harvard, did you say kilobots or KILLER BOTS?
NASA's rock'n'roll shock: ROLLING STONE FOUND ON MARS
No sign of Ziggy Stardust and his band
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.