Feeds

Truly secure clouds? Possible but not likely say Georgia Tech boffins

And that's before we hook up the Internet of Things

High performance access to file storage

Georgia Tech has added itself to the chorus, nay, throng of voices warning that poorly-implemented cloud computing and the world of BYO mobile devices are threats to enterprise security.

In its Emerging Cyber Threats 2014 report, GT's Information Security Center joins World+Dog in noting that the Snowden NSA whistle-blowing has concentrated minds wonderfully on the question “who's reading my cloud?”

However, trying to secure what leaves the premises comes at a cost, says GTISC director Wenke Lee: “Encryption in the cloud often impacts data accessibility and processing speed. So we are likely to see increased debate about the tradeoffs between security, functionality and efficiency.”

Even if a company bites the bullet and encrypts everything going to the cloud services it has bought on contract with an enterprise provider, the report notes that employees' individual use of “shadow” services like Dropbox, Box.com and Google's sharing services can undermine that security (although The Register notes that Google began encrypting enterprise level cloud data in August, and with more recent NSA revelations, the encryption deployment will probably expand).

In the mobile space, GTISC points to the university's own work on AppStore vetting bypasses and malicious chargers. No matter how robust vendors' security models might be, GTISC says this only deals with large-scale attacks: targeted attacks that can be used against smaller groups or individuals still remain a threat.

GTISC also highlights the burgeoning enthusiasm for the Internet of Things as an embryonic threat for the future. The report notes that the simplicity of IoT devices can be an attack point. Detecting, for example, counterfeit devices in an IoT environment is resource-intensive, the report notes, which works against the low-power and simplicity sought by device makers.

In the industrial space, the report also criticises system designers for failing to build defences against side-channel vulnerabilities such as timing attacks. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
NSA denies it knew about and USED Heartbleed encryption flaw for TWO YEARS
Agency forgets it exists to protect communications, not just spy on them
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.