Feeds

McDonalds ponders in-store 3D printing for Happy Meal toys

Would you like to supersize that molten plastic? (the toy, not the cheeseburger)

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

McDonalds is considering whether 3D printers could be used in its stores to produce the pocket-sized toys which are a key part of their Happy Meals.

The burger corp’s UK IT director, Mark Fabes, said he was looking at potential applications of 3d printing – and one was whether it could be used to produce the toys which are bundled in McDonalds’ Happy Meals.

Countless families have had their enjoyment of a nutritious McD’s ruined because they turned up the week that the starring character in that season's kiddie-sized blockbuster had been replaced by an earnest but boring supporting character as the toy of choice.

Being able to cook up Monsters Inc’s Sully to order could be an even bigger draw for many families than the ability to order a cheeseburger without semi-raw diced onion or a wafer of pickle.

However, before you pile down to your nearest branch, it’s worth pointing out that this is not even a pilot. Fabes was speaking on a panel on emerging technologies at a Fujitsu customer event in Munich. McDonalds has no current plans to explore 3D printing technology further.

“It's just a thought,” said Fabes, told El Reg.

He said apart from cost considerations, there was the issue of whether plastic smelting machines were appropriate for use in food outlets.

Right now there are few names in 3D printing that will be familiar to mainstream tech buyers. However, Meg Whitman told a conference recently that HP was considering an entry into the market.

Fabes said any move by McDonalds would have to be alongside a serious tech supplier: “It’s got to be a big partner in terms of robustness.” ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Nice computers don’t need to go to the toilet, says Barclays
Bad computers might ask if you are Sarah Connor
4K video on terrestrial TV? Not if the WRC shares frequencies to mobiles
Have your say with Ofcom now, before Freeview becomes Feeview
YES, iPhones ARE getting slower with each new release of iOS
Old hardware doesn't get any faster with new software
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
PEAK LANDFILL: Why tablet gloom is good news for Windows users
Sinofsky's hybrid strategy looks dafter than ever
You didn't get the MeMO? Asus Pad 7 Android tab is ... not bad
Really, er, stands out among cheapie 7-inchers
Apple winks at parents: C'mon, get your kid a tweaked Macbook Pro
Cheapest models given new processors, more RAM
VMware builds product executables on 50 Mac Minis
And goes to the Genius Bar for support
Leaked Windows Phone 8.1 Update specs tease details of Nokia's next mobes
New screen sizes, dual SIMs, voice over LTE, and more
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.