Feeds

Crack our 'military-grade' email encryption and we'll give you 5% of our firm

Hungarian startup tries novel bug-testing system

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

Vulnerability testing is commonplace these days, and a lucrative business for some, but a Hungarian biz is offering an unusual prize for anyone who manages to crack its email encryption system – a five per cent stake in the company.

The upstart, MySecureZone, has spent the last 22 months potting together a browser-based encryption system for email, instant messaging, VoIP and VPN traffic that it claims is bulletproof. In the case of email, for example, messages are encrypted and then sent to the firm's servers in Switzerland and Luxembourg, after which the recipient can pull them down and read them using a passphrase agreed with the sender.

"The goal of our company is to help people protect their online privacy and to bring the highest grade user-friendly IT security to the public. For ultimate security, our system rests on the strong foundations of open source," said Istvan Balazs, MySecureZone's CTO.

"We know that, on the Internet, the user login process is one of the most vulnerable areas of personal information protection. That's why we have created a state-of-the-art, web-based, two-factor authentication solution that is unique and innovative. This will ensure that, even with a weak password, your private messages will be safe and secure."

The competition, which began on Monday, challenges people to decrypt one of these emails and get hold of the message contents. Participants can apply to the firm for access to the encrypted email and the first person to break it open can claim a five per cent share of the firm; it's also running an Indiegogo campaign to raise $50,000 to get a commercial 'military-grade' version of the system up and running.

As publicity stunts go it's an interesting idea but, as one El Reg hack noted, if you've broken the encryption would you want a stake in the firm that's trying to sell it? ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
NUDE SNAPS AGENCY: NSA bods love 'showing off your saucy selfies'
Swapping other people's sexts is a fringe benefit, says Snowden
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
British data cops: We need greater powers and more money
You want data butt kicking, we need bigger boots - ICO
Crooks fling banking Trojan at Japanese smut site fans
Wait - they're doing online banking with an unpatched Windows PC?
NIST told to grow a pair and kick NSA to the curb
Lrn2crypto, oversight panel tells US govt's algorithm bods
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.