Feeds

Adobe users' purloined passwords were PATHETIC

'123456' used as password by nearly TWO MILLION punters

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Adobe's security breach just got worse for the company and the world, after a security researcher revealed that 1.9 million of the company's customers us the string “123456” as their password.

The researcher in question is Jeremi Gosney of the Stricture Group, whose Twitter profile claims The Reg has in the past labelled him a “password security expert”. Gosney says he came across the purloined passwords on one of several online dumps and analysed them to see which passwords are most-used by Adobe customers.

The list makes for ugly reading. Here's the top 20.

Password Number of users
1. 123456 1911938
2. 123456789 446162
3. password 345834
4. adobe123 211659
5. 12345678 201580
6. qwerty 130832
7. 1234567 124253
8. 111111 113884
9. photoshop 83411
10. 123123 82694
11. 1234567890 76910
12. 000000 76186
13. abc123 70791
14. 1234 61453
15. adobe1 56744
16. macromedia 54651
17. azerty 48850
18. iloveyou 47142
19. aaaaaa 44281
20. 654321 43670

Gosney's posted the top 100 here.

Adobe first said three million passwords were pinched in the raid, then upped that number to 38 million and raised the prospect of 150 million people being at risk.

Whatever the number, the results make Vulture South wonder if criminals should have bothered breaking in to steal them: with 1.9 million users relying on “123456” there's a better than one in one hundred chance of unlocking an Adobe account with blind luck.

That this should be the case says a lot about Adobe's password regulations, and maybe Adobe users too. To be fair to the company it's conceivable that many of its users signed up in days of yore, before complex passwords were either necessary or fashionable.

A counter-argument is that the company should have encouraged users to adopt more secure passwords a long time ago. It's doing so now: accounts have been frozen until users reset their passwords. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Parent gabfest Mumsnet hit by SSL bug: My heart bleeds, grins hacker
Natter-board tells middle-class Britain to purée its passwords
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.