Feeds

The Schmidt hits the Man: NSA spying on Google servers? 'OUTRAGEOUS!'

Collecting info on everyone ... isn't that the advertising giant's job?

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Google's executive chairman Eric Schmidt has branded the NSA's alleged surveillance of web giants' data centers "outrageous".

Speaking to The Wall Street Journal, Schmidt lashed out at American spooks after documents from whistleblower Edward Snowden suggested Google and Yahoo! data center links were being snooped on.

"It's really outrageous that the National Security Agency was looking between the Google data centers, if that's true," the search engine supremo was quoted as saying.

"The steps that the organization was willing to do without good judgment to pursue its mission and potentially violate people's privacy, it's not OK."

The remarks from the exec chairman come in the wake of revelations of a top-secret project known as MUSCULAR, which is believed to have harvested private and personal data by tapping into the fiber lines linking up server warehouses operated by Google, Yahoo! and others.

It's alleged more than 180 million records have been slurped in the MUSCULAR dragnet, run by Uncle Sam's NSA and the UK's GCHQ.

The outrage from Schmidt contrasts Google's sometimes arguably cavalier attitude to user privacy: the firm has been accused at various times of snooping on citizens' activities, including a scandal over the collection of Wi-Fi data by its Street View cars, which dogged Google for years. More recently, politicians have called on Google executives to discuss privacy concerns over the company's headset computers, Google Glass.

Schmidt himself said in 2009 of user privacy concerns: "If you have something that you don't want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place."

More recently, however, Google has been among the most vocal critics of government surveillance programs, speaking out against the internet dragnet-like PRISM platform and calling for greater transparency in how firms can report their interactions with spies, and demanding the ability to warn users when their information has been sought out. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Russian hackers exploit 'Sandworm' bug 'to spy on NATO, EU PCs'
Fix imminent from Microsoft for Vista, Server 2008, other stuff
FYI: OS X Yosemite's Spotlight tells Apple EVERYTHING you're looking for
It's on by default – didn't you read the small print?
Microsoft pulls another dodgy patch
Redmond makes a hash of hashing add-on
'LulzSec leader Aush0k' found to be naughty boy not worthy of jail
15 months home detention leaves egg on feds' faces as they grab for more power
Forget passwords, let's use SELFIES, says Obama's cyber tsar
Michael Daniel wants to kill passwords dead
Kill off SSL 3.0 NOW: HTTPS savaged by vicious POODLE
Pull it out ASAP, it is SWISS CHEESE
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.