Feeds

The Schmidt hits the Man: NSA spying on Google servers? 'OUTRAGEOUS!'

Collecting info on everyone ... isn't that the advertising giant's job?

The Power of One eBook: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

Google's executive chairman Eric Schmidt has branded the NSA's alleged surveillance of web giants' data centers "outrageous".

Speaking to The Wall Street Journal, Schmidt lashed out at American spooks after documents from whistleblower Edward Snowden suggested Google and Yahoo! data center links were being snooped on.

"It's really outrageous that the National Security Agency was looking between the Google data centers, if that's true," the search engine supremo was quoted as saying.

"The steps that the organization was willing to do without good judgment to pursue its mission and potentially violate people's privacy, it's not OK."

The remarks from the exec chairman come in the wake of revelations of a top-secret project known as MUSCULAR, which is believed to have harvested private and personal data by tapping into the fiber lines linking up server warehouses operated by Google, Yahoo! and others.

It's alleged more than 180 million records have been slurped in the MUSCULAR dragnet, run by Uncle Sam's NSA and the UK's GCHQ.

The outrage from Schmidt contrasts Google's sometimes arguably cavalier attitude to user privacy: the firm has been accused at various times of snooping on citizens' activities, including a scandal over the collection of Wi-Fi data by its Street View cars, which dogged Google for years. More recently, politicians have called on Google executives to discuss privacy concerns over the company's headset computers, Google Glass.

Schmidt himself said in 2009 of user privacy concerns: "If you have something that you don't want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place."

More recently, however, Google has been among the most vocal critics of government surveillance programs, speaking out against the internet dragnet-like PRISM platform and calling for greater transparency in how firms can report their interactions with spies, and demanding the ability to warn users when their information has been sought out. ®

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
Four fake Google haxbots hit YOUR WEBSITE every day
Goog the perfect ruse to slip into SEO orfice
Putin: Crack Tor for me and I'll make you a MILLIONAIRE
Russian Interior Ministry offers big pile o' roubles for busting pro-privacy browser
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.