Feeds

Murdoch: I'm a Jawbone fanboi - and it's going to help me live to 100!

Connect my blood to the internet, Smithers, leers media baron

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Press baron Rupert Murdoch has revealed he wears a Jawbone UP, the fitness-tracking bangle beloved of "quantified self" pushers and fitness fans.

Murdoch revealed his Jawbone habit in a speech delivered to Australia's Lowy Institute, a think tank established by billionaire Frank Lowy whose Westfield shopping mall empire brings wallet-emptying opportunities to Reg readers in the UK, USA, Australia and New Zealand.

Lowy's story is remarkable: a Jew, he survived World War II, fought in the Arab-Israel wars, reunited with his long-lost mother in Australia as a penniless teenager, became a billionaire, and found time to drag the Australian football (cough, soccer) team into three World Cups. His titular institute contemplates international policy through a centrist and humanitarian lens.

Each year, the organisation stages the “Lowy Lecture”, usually delivered by an internationally eminent person.

Rupert Murdoch got the gig this year and during his speech revealed his Jawbone use, albeit without quite knowing it's called the UP. He also could not resist a barb.

In this country, I have a reputation as a man who occasionally likes to jawbone. In fact, I now wear a Jawbone.

This is a bracelet that keeps track of how I sleep, move and eat – transmitting that information to the cloud. It allows me to track and maintain my health much better. It allows my family and I to know more about one another’s health too, which means it encourages more personal and social responsibility instead of just running to the doctor when we don’t feel well.

Murdoch's gone on the record in the past as saying he hopes to live to the age of 100. A hint of how he thinks that might happen emerged in his next observations about the networked health services of the future:

This is only the beginning. Soon we will have similar watches and apps that keep track of our heart rate, our blood sugar, our brain signals. When this information is coupled with what is available on the internet, it will mean the ability to diagnose and suggest treatments – instantly.

That will help us all live longer lives, yes. But it will also change the health industry and the health dynamic. Not to mention opening many new areas for research and profit.

Elsewhere in the talk, Murdoch mentions he has an iPhone and praises it and its ilk as changing the news business for the better by making it possible to read whatever one wants just about whenever and wherever one wants it.

“That is a huge leap for an industry that once had to rely on trucks and news agents alone to deliver news to readers,” he noted.

Murdoch also said “the stunning growth of mobile communications” is “perhaps the most revolutionary disruption in the last decade”. For News Ltd, he said “that disruption has actually been a shot of adrenalin.”

In a marvellous irony, three former News Ltd staff have pleaded guilty to, er, very disruptive use of mobile technology. We suspect the phone-hacking charges they copped to aren't what Murdoch is alluding to in his talk. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Israeli spies rebel over mass-snooping on innocent Palestinians
'Disciplinary treatment will be sharp and clear' vow spy-chiefs
Apple CEO Tim Cook: TV is TERRIBLE and stuck in the 1970s
The iKing thinks telly is far too fiddly and ugly – basically, iTunes
Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales
Giganto mobe firm slams door shut on Microsoft. OH DEAR
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.