Feeds

John Kerry bombshell: 'Yes, the NSA... reached TOO FAR, inappropriately'

But the US Secretary of State remains defiant amid global surveillance outrage

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

US Secretary of State John Kerry has issued a rare mea culpa on behalf of the US government and its NSA surveillance platforms.

Speaking at a panel discussion for the Open Government Partnership, Kerry said that in its efforts to thwart terrorists, the US had gone "too far" in its collection of personal data, but insisted that reports of massive data hoarding were untrue.

"I assure you, innocent people are not being abused in this process," Kerry said, "but there is an effort to gather information, and yes, in some cases it has reached too far, inappropriately."

"Our President is determined to clarify and is now doing a thorough review in order that nobody will have a sense of abuse."

Sentiment of such a "sense of abuse" has been rampant among both the domestic and international communities in recent days.

Earlier this week, a number of major providers, including Google and Yahoo, were found to have unwittingly supplied the government with some 180 million records via NSA surveillance programs.

The disclosure adds to an already hefty government data repository first uncovered with the revelation of the PRISM platform by whistleblower Edward Snowden, the now-infamous consultant living under asylum in Russia.

Further reports from the international community have suggested that the spying activities have also extended to the diplomatic arena, as reports out of Germany indicated that US agents may have tapped lines of communication used by government officials, including Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Even when fessing up to the use of heavy-handed tactics, Kerry remained defiant on the most recent reports, denying that tens of millions of people were having their data slurped through the NSA pipeline.

"There is a tremendous amount of exaggeration and misreporting in some of what is out there," he said.

"What we are trying to do is, in a random way, find ways of trying to learn if in fact there is a threat that we need to respond to." ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
Apple tried to get a ban on Galaxy, judge said: NO, NO, NO
Judge Koh refuses Samsung ban for the third time
Pedals and wheel in that Google robo-car or it's off the road – Cali DMV
And insists on $5 million insurance per motor against accidents
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?