Feeds

Give young infosec boffins more cash or BAD THINGS will happen – RSA boff

State-sponsored malware already making crypto 'irrelevant'

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

RSA Europe 2013 Declining support for young science and technology researchers from the US government could hurt technology innovation in the long term, a top computer scientist has warned.

Robert Griffin, chief security architect at information security biz RSA, said complaints about funding featured in all three pairs of Nobel Prize acceptance speeches this year.

Funding is not too much of a problem for established researchers but for "younger researchers there's pressure to publish early or quickly," said Griffin. Government funding for academic research has been cut because of tough economic conditions – but, said Griffin, this is a short-sighted approach because it will hurt researchers over the long term.

Zurich-based Griffin, who has given lectures at MIT and is heavily involved in the EU's Smart Grid project, said that industry needs to engage in the research community. Yet other sources of support are also needed because research breakthroughs can take years to filter down into front-line products.

For example, the RSA algorithm was the result of work by three young researchers - Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir, and Len Adleman - in 1976. RSA Security was formed six years later in 1984.

During the US edition of the RSA Conference, Shamir said that cryptography is “becoming less important” because of state-sponsored malware. The godfather of encryption warned the security industry to prepare for a 'post-crypto world'.

Griffin, who is also co-chair of the OASIS Key Management Interoperability Protocol (KMIP) technical committee, was more upbeat and optimistic. While he stressed the need for continuous review of code, and highlighted the danger potentially posed by prime factorisation methods and other code-breaking techniques, he added that there's still an "opportunity for breakthroughs" in cryptography protocols and schemes.

At a more strategic level, game theory offers a possible means to get ahead of attackers – or, at least, to develop better techniques that can thwart or frustrate hacking attacks, according to Griffin.

Such strategies might include changing crypto keys at a frequency rapid enough to make brute force attacks unviable, as explained in more depth in a paper on the application of game theory to security problems co-authored by Griffin and Ron Rivest.

Griffin added that using security analytics and other techniques, such as the application of the DevOps method, offers a combined approach for improving security defences. ®

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
Google recommends pronounceable passwords
Super Chrome goes into battle with Mr Mxyzptlk
Reddit wipes clean leaked celeb nudie pics, tells users to zip it
Now we've had all THAT TRAFFIC, we 'deplore' this theft
YouTube, Amazon and Yahoo! caught in malvertising mess
Cisco says 'Kyle and Stan' attack is spreading through compromised ad networks
TorrentLocker unpicked: Crypto coding shocker defeats extortionists
Lousy XOR opens door into which victims can shove a foot
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
Microsoft to patch ASP.NET mess even if you don't
We know what's good for you, because we made the mess says Redmond
NORKS ban Wi-Fi and satellite internet at embassies
Crackdown on tardy diplomatic sysadmins providing accidental unfiltered internet access
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.