Feeds

Toshiba brings out terabyte laptop drive (yes), miracle enterprise-grade TLC

Not just for USB sticks any more

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

The storage Tardis effect continues: Toshiba has crammed 1TB into a thin disk drive and signed a license to use DenseBits technology in its flash memory products.

The Tardis is Doctor Who’s time-travelling telephone kiosk which is somehow larger inside than outside. So it is with storage disk and NAND products which are able to continually hold more and more data inside their small casings.

On the disk front Toshiba has gone and designed a 7mm thick 2.5in disk drive storing 1TB on its two platters. This the MQ02ABF, PDF data sheet here, an updated version of the MQ01ABF, “01” meaning 1 x 500GB platter and “02” meaning 2 x 500GB platters. The areal density is 744Gbit/in2 and the little twin spinner spins at 5.400rpm with a 6Gbit/s SATA interface.

It uses dual-stage head positioning technology to make track location and following more precise, and is available at 759GB and 1TB capacity points. It’s intended for use in Ultrabooks and similarly space-constrained applications.

Toshiba MQ02ABF

Toshiba MQ02ABF 2-platter 7mm 2.5in disk drive

The company has also signed a license to use DensBits technology. This Israeli startup has devised so-called Memory Modem technology and it’s being touted as good for making short-lived 3-layer cell (TLC) flash technology usable. The trouble with this stuff is that it dies after relatively few writes compared to MLC (2-layer cell) flash, meaning that it has been used so far only in USB sticks and camera flash cards - certainly not in enterprise flash applications.

This Memory Modem (MOdulator DEModulator) technology somehow makes TLC longer-lived so it can, hopefully, be used in enterprise-class apps. Our expectation is that Toshiba is looking to it for help in producing TLC NAND for enterprises. Old telephone modem technology once enabled analogue telephone circuits to carry digital data. Presumably - a big presume - the Memory Modem enables a digital flash memory system to receive reliable data from the signals obtained from blocks of flash memory cells.

Dipping into the tinned quotes in the announcement release tells us little, though. Amir Tirosh, DensBits’ EVP for marketing and business development, says this:

“Our proprietary Memory Modem controller technology combined with Toshiba’s industry leading Flash memory technology will allow the introduction of superior Flash storage solutions in terms of cost, reliability, and performance.”

Golly gee.

Sample MQ02ABF drives will be available in November. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.