Feeds

New Oz government keeps Huawei ban after spook briefing

Attorney-General won't review exclusion from 'NBN'

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

The brief thawing of Australian government attitudes to Huawei has turned out to be a false springtime, with the nation's new Attorney-General George Brandis deciding that the decision to keep the Chinese giant out of the National Broadband Network (NBN) will remain.

According to the Australian Financial Review, the decision comes after briefings from unnamed intelligence services.

Huawei had been excluded from providing kit to the NBN under the previous government, shortly after US President Barack Obama's visit to the country in November 2011. It's often been assumed Obama, or one of those who made the visit with him, whispered something scary into Australia's ear about the Chinese company during that visit.

Before Australia's election, which saw the Liberal/National coalition replace the Labor government, various senior Liberal Party figures floated a review of Huawei's pariah status. That Huawei had appointed former Liberal Party ministers to its board was seen as a sign the company would receive a favorable hearing from the new government.

As Vulture South previously reported, this appeared to suggest the vendor's long work to get on the right side of the government was starting to pay off, something now scuppered by Brandis.

The attorney-general hasn't detailed the reasons for his decision, merely telling the AFR that “Since the election the new government has had further briefings from the national security agencies. No decision has been made by the new government to change the existing policy.”

Which leaves open an important question: if the USA thinks Huawei is dangerous and Australia thinks Huawei is dangerous and the two share intelligence, as we know they do, why doesn't the UK think Huawei is dangerous? ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw
Have you been on YouPorn lately, perhaps? White House website?
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Black Hat anti-Tor talk smashed by lawyers' wrecking ball
Unmasking hidden users is too hot for Carnegie-Mellon
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.