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Does Apple make you puke? Take this iOS 7.0.3 update with your tablets

No more nausea-inducing UI effects – and the Lock Screen bypass claimed fixed, as well

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Apple has released an iOS 7 update that will be welcomed by iPhone and iPad owners who were sickened by the mobile operating system's user interface.

We hasten to point out that we're referring to those users actually sickened – made nauseous, dizzy, or given headaches – by their gadgets' zoom-happy interface. For those of you who are merely aesthetically revolted by the new look-and-feel, well, we'll just refer you to the old Latin maxim, de gustibus non est disputandum.

In its default state, iOS 7 zooms in and out of apps and features – tap an app icon, and the app lurches open; click the Home button, and you zoom back to the appropriate icon or folder on the Home Screen.

For some users, this zooming effect is a helpful reminder of navigation paths. For others – especially those who suffer from disorders of the inner ear such as Ménière's disease or labyrinthitis – it makes them want to puke.

The zooming isn't the only problem – there is also the pseudo 3D parallax effect that makes icons appear to move in relation to the Home Screen background. Complaints about both effects have flooded Apple's support forums.

In iOS versions 7.0.2 and earlier, it was possible to turn off the parallax effect by going to Settings > General > Accessibility > Reduce Motion and flipping to toggle to On. The zooming, however, continued – as did the nausea, headaches, dizziness, and other unpleasantries experienced by some iOS 7 users.

Apple heard the complaints, and has now issued the hopefully de-pukifying iOS 7.0.3 update. Now when you switch the Reduce Motion toggle, the zooming effects are stifled along with the parallax effect, and replaced by a quick cross-fade.

iOS 7.0.3 includes a number of other tweaks as well, from adding an iCloud Keychain and a Safari Password Generator to fixing accelerometer calibration bugs and another flaw that could allow miscreants to bypass the Lock Screen passcode. You can read more about the additions and fixes here.

But as welcome as these new capabilities and bug fixes may be, they're nothing compared to sparing iPhone users from driving the porcelain bus, talking to Ralph on the big porcelain phone, or disgorging a technicolor yawn.

However, for those of you sickened by iOS 7 for reasons of taste and style rather than zooming or parallax, well, there's always Android. ®

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