Feeds

Apple's Hacker Princess really needs to stay away from Idaho cops

Luckily 'Call yourself a hacker' ruling doesn't apply in California

The essential guide to IT transformation

Apple has given a job to a "princess hacker" in a move that potentially opens the fruity firm up to police raids... that's if its new employee ever visits Idaho.

Kristin Paget tweeted pictures of her Apple business card yesterday, which clearly showed her bizarre new job title.

But Paget risks attracting the unwanted attention of police, because a US district court has ruled that anyone calling themselves a "hacker" forfeits their Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable searches and property seizures.

An Idaho court decided that a software developer’s computer could be seized without warning, simply because he admitted that he likes "hacking things and [doesn't] want to stop”.

Although the ruling does not carry over to California, it raises the very real prospect that Paget's computer could be seized if she visits Idaho. If she works there, cops might even be able to justify booting her door down.

Here's how Paget announced her new job:

The "Princess Hacker" added:

However, other Twitter users quickly warned Paget of the risk of losing Fourth Amendment protections, to which she replied:

Paget was part of a team of hackers roped in to work on the security of Windows Vista. She is now working for Apple and describes herself as "just a girl who hacks things. iThings, currently".

Paget, formerly known as Chris, has kept her own transition from male to female far less hush-hush than the day job. On her blog, Tom Bom, Paget shared intimate details of her gender journey, detailing her new-found experiences of PMS, a hormone-induced drive towards "nesting" and the onset of "girlbrain".

She also used the blog to thank the infosec community as well as her wife for the support they offered during her transition.

Paget's story also raises the curious thought that Apple employees are allowed to choose their own job title. What snazzy name would you pick if you worked for Tim Cook and co, commentards? ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine
Activists told NOT to snap pics of staff at the concrete doughnut
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Redmond resists order to hand over overseas email
Court wanted peek as related to US investigation
What do you mean, I have to POST a PHYSICAL CHEQUE to get my gun licence?
Stop bitching about firearms fees - we need computerisation
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
NZ Justice Minister scalped as hacker leaks emails
Grab your popcorn: Subterfuge and slur disrupts election run up
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?