Feeds

Google fires fresh salvo in war on FILTH: Chrome Supervised Users

Aw, come on, dad, can I look at 4chan pleeeeeaaase?

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

In the never-ending quest to shield impressionable minds from some of the internet's less family-friendly content, Google has unveiled "supervised users" for Chrome on Windows, OS X, Linux, and Chrome OS.

A supervised user is a special class of Chrome user account that's created and controlled by another user who acts as its "manager," such as a parole officer parent.

By default, a supervised user has all of the same permissions that any other Chrome user has, but additional restrictions can be assigned at the manager's discretion. For example, certain sites can be blocked, or the supervised user's account can be set to a whitelist configuration so that it can only visit approved sites.

By default, sites are blocked based on specific URLs – so if a manager chooses to block Google search at google.com, for instance, the supervised user will still be able to access Gmail at mail.google.com. Managers can optionally block entire domains using wildcards, such as *.google.com, or *.google.* to block all country-specific domains.

Supervised users can contest these restrictions by filing access requests with their manager, which managers can approve or deny via the supervised users dashboard.

Managers also have the ability to view a supervised user's browsing history and to lock the Google search engine's SafeSearch feature to a setting that won't allow any untoward results to show up.

But Google cautions that adding a supervised user to Chrome isn't like adding a new user to your operating system, in that it's considerably less secure. Supervised users can close their supervised browser windows and browse as any other Chrome user account for which they have a password.

"If you are the manager of a supervised user, you can always remove your own Chrome profile from the computer or sign out of Chrome before handing it off to a supervised user," the online ad giant helpfully explains.

It could be some time before this feature makes it into the mainstream, stable version of the Chrome browser, however. For now, it's being rolled out for testing this week via the Chrome Beta channel. Users daring enough to work with a beta browser are encouraged to try it out and submit feedback via Google's Chromebook forums. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows
Behold the Internet of Things. Wintel Things
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android
Freehand input on non-Windows kit for the first time
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.