Feeds

AMD avoids a red-ink-stained quarter for once, market says 'meh'

Increase in desktop CPU revenue and console boost can't excite Wall Street

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

Perennial chip challenger Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) has posted a profit for the third quarter of 2013, a turnaround that has failed to excite investors.

The good news is that AMD hauled $US1.46bn through the door during the quarter, which means it was in the black by $95m, or 0.06 per share, according to generally-accepted accounting principles. There's $1.2bn of cash kicking around in the kitty, $100m more than AMD feels is optimal, and sales of GPU-related kit kicked up “110 percent sequentially and increased 96 percent year-over-year”. That rise can probably be attributed to all those PS4s and XBOX 360s being assembled ready for arrival in stores for pre-Christmas.

On the downside, “decreased notebook and chipset unit shipments” contributed to a six per cent dip in revenue from “computing solutions”, although the company reported its desktop kit did a little better than expected. Desktop sales even grew a little, a nice counter-trend win for for the company.

The results are decent given the nicest thing we were able to say about the previous quarter's results was that they represented a smaller-than-expected loss.

So why did the market push the company's shares down seven per cent, with most of the fall coming in after-hours trading? Financial types worry that AMD's wagon is still hitched to the PC business, which is in trouble worldwide, and that its plans to get into embedded devices with both x86 and ARM kit will take time and are not guaranteed to succeed.

AMD itself feels better times are around the corner, reporting that customers are starting to adopt its recently-released new GPUS and expressing optimism the recently-revealed R7 and R9 Series graphics cards will excite software developers. SeaMicro's win powering Verizon's cloud is also cited as a good thing. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
It may be ILLEGAL to run Heartbleed health checks – IT lawyer
Do the right thing, earn up to 10 years in clink
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.