Feeds

Cannabis can CURE CANCER - cheaply and without getting you high

Amazing jazz-cigarette breakthrough by London medical boffins

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The non-hallucinogenic parts of cannabis seem to be potentially highly effective anti-cancer drugs, according to a new study.

“This study is a critical step in unpicking the mysteries of cannabis as a source of medicine," explains Dr Wai Liu. "The cannabinoids examined have minimal, if any, hallucinogenic side effects, and their properties as anti-cancer agents are promising.

“These agents are able to interfere with the development of cancerous cells, stopping them in their tracks and preventing them from growing. In some cases, by using specific dosage patterns, they can destroy cancer cells on their own."

Researchers have long studied the effects of the main active ingredient in cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This acts against cancer, but has the disadvantage (or advantage, as far as recreational users are concerned) of being a powerful hallucinogen. However there hasn't been much investigation into the properties of other compounds found in cannabis, in large part due to the fact that it has been illegal or closely controlled in many jurisdictions.

But now Liu and colleagues at St George's Hospital Medical School (part of London uni) have tested a range of different, non-hallucinogenic cannabis-derived compounds against the blood cancer leukaemia - with encouraging results.

We are told, in a St George's statement:

Of six cannabinoids studied, each demonstrated anti-cancer properties as effective as those seen in THC. Importantly, they had an increased effect on cancer cells when combined with each other ...

The study examined two forms of cannabidiol (CBD), two forms of cannabigerol (CBG) and two forms of cannabigevarin (CBGV). These represent the most common cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant apart from THC.

“Used in combination with existing treatment, we could discover some highly effective strategies for tackling cancer," enthuses Liu. "Significantly, these compounds are inexpensive to produce and making better use of their unique properties could result in much more cost effective anti-cancer drugs in future.”

The full research can be read here in the journal Anticancer Research. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Boffins who stare at goats: I do believe they’re SHRINKING
Alpine chamois being squashed by global warming
What's that STINK? Rosetta probe shoves nose under comet's tail
Rotten eggs, horse dung and almonds – yuck
Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill
Hiding from this space pimple isn't going to do humanity's reputation any good
Kip Thorne explains how he created the black hole for Interstellar
Movie special effects project spawns academic papers on gravitational lensing
Experts brand LOHAN's squeaky-clean box
Phytosanitary treatment renders Vulture 2 crate fit for export
LONG ARM of the SAUR: Brachially gifted dino bone conundrum solved
Deinocheirus mirificus was a bit of a knuckle dragger
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.