Feeds

Facebook throws servers on their back in HOT TUBS of OIL

These babies weren't built for comfort - they were built for SPEED

Application security programs and practises

Exclusive Facebook is dunking its servers in gloop in a salt shed in Oregon so it can overclock their processors, The Register has learned.

The experimental, brutal "immersion cooling" scheme was revealed to us by Facebook hardware design and supply chain bigwig Frank Frankovsky on Friday. Though Facebook had tested out an immersion cooled server in 2012, the company is now moving to get the kit into a state where it can be deployed en masse.

"Today we and most others use 100 percent outside air [to cool servers]," Frankovsky explains. "One of the really cool and intriguing things that is a potential future would be to see how far we could overclock CPUs if we could cool them with liquid."

To figure out if liquid cooling is appropriate for its systems, the company is currently experimenting with a design that turns an Open Compute Project server rack onto its side and runs the power busbar systems parallel to the floor, with motherboards plugging in on top, he said.

"Most of the thought we have around that cooling is that Open Rack laid flat on its back," Frankovsky explained.

By surrounding the servers in a liquid the company should be able to ramp up the clockspeed of their processors without worrying about breaking the CPUs, he said.

But this brings its own problems, due to the "pretty slippery" liquid. Frankovsky notes that it's not usually a good idea to fill a data center with viscous gloop.

"If you want to deploy those immersion cooling bathtubs at scale you have to have the service mode wrapped up and then you envision the way robotics could play – keep it over a drip tray and go back to a repair room."

Facebook has no immediate plans to put the systems into production, but is pushing on with the scheme as "we've got the reality of how to make it a servicable configuration," Frankovsky said.

Facebook didn't disclose the precise technology it was using for the scheme, but we would note that a company named Iceotope came out of stealth this year with a magic liquid named 3M Novec that is non-conductive and viscous.

For this reason, and given Frankovsky's description of the slippery gloop Facebook is using, we doubt the company is doing water cooling via radiator panels as many supercomputer operators do. ®

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
SHOCK and AWS: The fall of Amazon's deflationary cloud
Just as Jeff Bezos did to books and CDs, Amazon's rivals are now doing to it
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
The triumph of VVOL: Everyone's jumping into bed with VMware
'Bandwagon'? Yes, we're on it and so what, say big dogs
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.