Feeds

Crowdsourced campaign scoops $AUD40k for pro-FTTP NBN ads

Comms Minister Turnbull's local rag to get fibrous promotion

Build a business case: developing custom apps

A crowdsourced campaign that aims to buy advertisements calling for Australia's national broadband network (NBN) to stick with its original fibre-to-the-premises (FTTP) plan has soared past its $AUD15,000 funding target and now has a war chest of over $40,000 to splash.

The campaign's original aim was to raise enough cash to pop an ad on the front page of Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull's local newspaper The Wentworth Courier.

Turnbull took a policy for a a fibre-to-the-node (FTTN) NBN to Australia's September election, which the Liberal/National coalition of which he is a member won. The Minister advocates FTTN as cheaper and faster to build, and probably as scalable as optical fibre if future technologies advance as expected.

That position has been challenged by a great many pundits and has also been the subject of a change.org petition that gathered over 250,000 signatures.

The campaigners are clearly aware of that effort, as they write “Already over a quarter of a million people have signed the largest change.org petition in Australia asking Malcolm Turnbull to listen” to their preference for FTTP. They also assert “every major poll sends the same message too”.

Turnbull's reaction to the petition has been to point out that his NBN policy was made available well before the election, so should come as no surprise. There's some chance the policy will change, as he has ordered a review of the NBN, but it's hard to see the new Minister backing away from his core plan.

The campaigners, meanwhile, are chuffed with the level of support and plan to use the cash to buy ads beyond The Wentworth Courier. “We’re going to get ads in other papers too - we’re currently working out where we can get the best placements,” the campaign page says.

The Reg has attempted to contact the campaigners and will update this story if they reply. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.