Feeds

Digia gives Android and iOS devs a chance to get Qt

One library to rule at least 14 of them

Maximizing your infrastructure through virtualization

App and UI framework Qt is finally coming to Android and iOS in the form of Qt Mobile Edition, allowing cross-platform apps to take their GUI from desk to pocket for only $150 a month.

Unveiled at the Qt Developer Days in Berlin, the Mobile Edition provides everything the Qt developer needs to get apps onto mobile devices – or it will when it launches in December as part of Qt 5.2. But platform independence costs: in Qt's case, $149 per developer seat per month.

It's not the first time Qt has been squeezed onto a mobile platform. The application framework was developed by Trolltech in the '90s for desktop use, but was appearing in handsets as far back as 2000 and pushed as a platform in 2006 before being adopted, and acquired, by Nokia in 2008 as the unifying platform for its increasingly-fragmented smartphone efforts.

Sadly, that platform was one of those fingered for the chop by incoming Nokia CEO Stephen Elop, and was unceremoniously dumped on Digia, who had been licensing the framework for desktop use and was thus the only company likely to do anything useful with it.

There was a lone developer who took the open-source version of Qt and started beating it into an Android shape under the "Necessitas" moniker, but they threw the code Digia's way in November last year.

Qt, on desktop, has an active user base of around half a million, funding a business worth about €20m a year. Apps including the ever-popular VideoLAN media player and Mathematica were developed using Qt, and now should be able to move to mobile with the minimum of effort, if they weren't there already.

Digia admits that the Android and iOS ports, which are already present as a Technology Preview, will most likely appeal to existing users of Qt. However, they might encourage new developers to explore the framework and perhaps achieve their dream of cross-platform compatibility, which Java, JavaScript, HTML, GTK+, Juce, Mono, Tcl/Tk, and so many others have failed to properly realise. ®

Reducing security risks from open source software

More from The Register

next story
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS
Google is only now fixing ancient, energy-sapping bug
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.