Feeds

Boffins offer ROUTER DEATHLIST for software-defined network builders

You didn't think SDN would mean no upgrades, did you?

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Unless you've got fathomless pockets, a scary aspect of a software-defined networking implementation is the necessity for an infrastructure upgrade, since nobody wants to forklift every router in a big network all at once. Now, a paper co-authored by Nokia Siemens Networks' Marco Hoffmann proposes a set of algorithms to help plan the rollout.

The aim of the paper, published at Arxiv here, is to create a methodology that takes into account the current state of a network, balancing gains from traffic engineering with limitations on capital expenditure. Perhaps obviously, the authors say that “the sequence of migration plays a vital role, especially in the early stages of network migration to SDN”.

The group, which includes three authors from the Technical University at Braunschweig (Tamal Das, Marcel Caria and Admela Jukan), took on the system architect's perennial question: “if there's got to be an upgrade, which kit do I nuke first?”

As the paper puts it, in more academic terms: “operators need to understand how their network can make best use of traffic engineering capabilities enabled by SDN, during various stages of a migration process.”

Implementing SDN - difficult choices

Some of your routers get migrated first - but

which ones? Image source: arxiv.org/pdf/1310.0216v1.pdf

To try and answer this question, the researchers produced algorithms designed to assess two constraint cases: the network operator is limited either by the number of routers that can be migrated in a single step, or is limited by the available capex at any given moment (these cases look identical, but they aren't quite, since in the first case, the time it takes to drop in a new router is a more important constraint than the money needed to buy it).

The process starts with a path analysis to identify key nodes that must be SDN-enabled if a path is to be used for traffic engineering. For these paths, the paper presents “greedy algorithms” that test different migration scenarios for maximum performance gains under the different migration constraints. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
729 teraflops, 71,000-core Super cost just US$5,500 to build
Cloud doubters, this isn't going to be your best day
Want to STUFF Facebook with blatant ADVERTISING? Fine! But you must PAY
Pony up or push off, Zuck tells social marketeers
Oi, Europe! Tell US feds to GTFO of our servers, say Microsoft and pals
By writing a really angry letter about how it's harming our cloud business, ta
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
SAVE ME, NASA system builder, from my DEAD WORKSTATION
Anal-retentive hardware nerd in paws-on workstation crisis
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management
How using vulnerability assessments to identify exploitable weaknesses and take corrective action can reduce the risk of hackers finding your site and attacking it.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.