Feeds

Boffins demo new holo storage using graphene oxide

Busted disk? No problem

SANS - Survey on application security programs

We realise at El Reg that holographic storage has been on the “real soon now” list practically forever, but it's a topic that never loses its research fascination. Especially when, as has been demonstrated by a Swinburne University research group, the data that's stored can be retrieved even if the disk is broken.

That's the promise held out by this paper in Nature (available in full). Ignoring the scintillating title – “Giant refractive-index modulation by two-photon reduction of fluorescent graphene oxides for multimode optical recording” – at least one of the characteristics of the graphene oxide-based holographic storage is data retrieval from broken media.

Considering just how much money your average data centre spends in replicating information many times over (live copy, disaster recovery snapshot, backup and so on), the researchers hope that a commercial realisation of their technology would end up saving money for operators.

It rests on the fluorescent properties of graphene oxide, according to this Swinburne University release. As well as sharing the characteristics graphene is known for – strength, lightness, flexibility, conductivity and near-transparency – graphene oxide's fluorescence and refractive index can be manipulated.

“By focusing an ultrashort laser beam onto the graphene oxide polymer, the researchers created a 10-100 times increase in the refractive-index of the graphene oxide along with a decrease in its fluorescence”, the release states.

That can be used for multimode optical recording, according to professor Min Gu, director of the university's Centre for Micro-Photonics. The university explains their test process thus:

To demonstrate the feasibility of the mechanism, the researchers encoded the image of a kangaroo in a computer generated hologram. The hologram was then rendered as a three-dimensional recording to the graphene oxide polymer. The encrypted patterns in the hologram could not be seen as a normal microscope image, but could be retrieved in the diffracted mode.

“The giant refractive index of this material shows promise for merging data storage with holography for security coding,” Professor Gu said. The same feature means that data can be recovered from a broken device. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Red-faced LOHAN team 'fesses up in blown SPEARS fuse fiasco
Standing in the corner, big pointy 'D' hats
KILLER SPONGES menacing California coastline
Surfers are safe, crustaceans less so
Fancy joining Reg hack on quid-a-day challenge?
Recruiting now for charity starvation diet
LOHAN's Punch and Judy show relaunches Thursday
Weather looking good for second pop at test flights
Discovery time for 200m WONDER MATERIALS shaved from 4 MILLENNIA... to 4 years
Alloy, Alloy: Boffins in speed-classification breakthrough
Curiosity finds not-very-Australian-shaped rock on Mars
File under 'messianic pastries' and move on, people
Elon Musk's LEAKY THRUSTER gas stalls Space Station supply run
Helium seeps from Falcon 9 first stage, delays new legs for NASA robonaut
Top Secret US payload launched into space successfully
Clandestine NRO spacecraft sets off on its unknown mission
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.