Feeds

Aruba rolls out cloudy enterprise Wi-Fi management system

Yours for a hundred quid a year

Security for virtualized datacentres

Aruba Networks' latest Wi-Fi routers now come with a cloud service designed to stop sysadmins needing to wander the country, allowing remote monitoring and management – in exchange for an annual subscription.

Aruba's access points already come with software for self-configuration, and USB sockets ready to use a cellular connection in an emergency, but now those points will report the device's status and take commands from a cloud-based management system, assuming the user stumps up £105 a year for the privilege.

It might seem like a lot of money to avoid using the on-board management, but Aruba is pitching "Aruba Central" at enterprises with dispersed sites they want to keep connected without having to get their hands dirty with site visits.

With the cloud management system, the enterprise can deploy the access points to its remote sites. Local staff just need to plug in an Ethernet cable – the points will accept Power over Ethernet, so IP phones and the like can be patched in too – and once the device has a working connection it hooks itself up to the Aruba cloud, ready to be managed by the enterprise BOFH from the comfort of his office – or the nearby pub, as utility demands.

Aruba access points already support SNMP, as does Aruba Central, but (as the company points out) SNMP has no protocol for wireless functionality, such as reporting RF interference or requesting a change of 802.11n frequency – all of which can be managed through the cloud service.

Right now that service stands alone, but Aruba is looking at integration with other network management tools. Spiceworks is a bit low-end for their customer base, but there are plenty of options once customers ask for them.

As is so often the case these days, Aruba isn't running its own cloud servers. The hardware is hired from one of the big Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) providers (the company declined to say which one), meaning it can scale the offering depending on how many customers take an interest. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
CAGE MATCH: Microsoft, Dell open co-located bit barns in Oz
Whole new species of XaaS spawning in the antipodes
VMware's tool to harden virtual networks: a spreadsheet
NSX security guide lands in intriguing format
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.