Feeds

WD embraces C word* and hews HDD handles from NAS kit

*‘Cloud’, you fool - what do you think we meant?

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Western Digital is re-branding its MyBook Live line of basic NAS boxes to better stress the device’s personal cloud capabilities. So yes, from today they will be called MyCloud drives.

They’ll also getting new internals, a revamped casing and upgraded software for devices that want to tap into the drives’ storage.

Inside, you’re now looking at 2TB and 3TB of single-drive storage. A 4TB model will arrive next month. Alongside the drive, WD has fitted each MyCloud with a quad-core ARM processor to run the on-board server software and such.

The units connect to your local network through a Gigabit Ethernet port, and there’s a USB 3.0 port on the back for directly scraping content off connected cameras, to expand the on-board storage with an external hard drive, or to back-up the NAS’ contents.

WD MyCloud

Like the MyBook Live drives, the MyCloud runs DLNA and iTunes servers, and can be configured through a web-based UI if you need to set up user accounts and quotes, and such.

With the launch of MyCloud, WD’s existing mobile access app, WD2Go will be renamed MyCloud too and updated to support the new devices too. Entirely new is WD’s desktop app, which has been designed to provide Windows and Mac OS X users a single place from which move files back and forth between the MyCloud, their computer and any storage they have with the major cloud sync’n’store services, Dropbox, SkyDrive and Google Drive among them, just as they already can with the Android and iOS apps.

Indeed, WD’s name change is all about pitching its NAS boxes as expansion for those services’ free-storage deals. If 2GB of gratis Dropbox capacity isn’t sufficient, says WD, 130 quid will get you 2TB of your own, personal cloud storage to increase it.

WD MyCloud

Run out of space on the cloud storage and you can offload files to your MyCloud to make room. Why keep Dropbox or SkyDrive at all, then? Because for all MyCloud’s claimed speed improvements over the previous generation of WD’s boxes, you’re still limited by your ISP’s upload performance, Chris Bull, WD’s Director of Marketing admitted. Dropbox et al, on the other hand, have fat data pipes enabling much quicker transfers.

That set of circumstances isn’t likely to change in the near future, hence WD’s move to pitch MyCloud not as an alternative to popular online storage services but as a more capacious adjunct to them.

Of course, the existing MyBook Live NAS drives do all this too, but WD thinks it’ll sell more to storage-bereft punters if it makes more of the C word.

Connections between device and MyClouds are encrypted using 128-bit AES and are direct links, with WD’s servers handling the initial mediation.

The 2TB MyCloud is available now for £129, the 3TB version for £159. WD has yet to set the price of the 4TB drive. ®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Bored with trading oil and gold? Why not flog some CLOUD servers?
Chicago Mercantile Exchange plans cloud spot exchange
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
Cisco reps flog Whiptail's Invicta arrays against EMC and Pure
Storage reseller report reveals who's selling what
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.