Feeds

Missing Brit SPACE HEDGEHOG RISES from the GRAVE

Battered CASSiE miraculously found in Nottinghamshire field

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Pics The Brit space hedgehog which went missing back in March during a high-altitude ballooning mission has miraculously been recovered, battered and bruised but otherwise intact.

CASSiE (Cosmic Ambassador for Space Science and Engineering) took off from Frome in Somerset as part of the MARSBalloon project to send student experiment podules to the stratosphere.

MARSBalloon team members Michael Guest and Claire Parfitt show off Deimos and Phobos the night before launch

Two payloads - Deimos and Phobos - left the ground, but only Phobos was successfully recovered later the same day. Cue a frantic search for CASSiE, believed to have come down somewhere over Oxfordshire or Warwickshire.

In fact, the mission had ended in a field in Nottinghamshire, where on 22 September, farm worker Simon Jacklin ran over the errant payload with an agricultural mower.

A photo of the payload on the ground, somewhat damaged

A close shave. Pic: Simon Jacklin

Handily, the remains still had MARSBalloon lead engineer Andrew Bacon's phone number on them. Jacklin said: "I wasn't sure what I had found at first, but after I spoke to Andrew I was really glad I noticed it."

MARSBalloon team member Claire Parfitt, Simon Jacklin and Cassie rescuer Andrew Bacon

MARSBalloon team members Claire Parfitt and Andrew Bacon, with CASSiE rescuer Simon Jacklin (centre)

Bacon and Claire Parfitt rushed to the scene for an emotional reunion with a shaken CASSiE, although they didn't know just how shaken the space hedgehog was until they reviewed the onboard camera footage.

First up, the payload had immediately copped a soaking as it drifted towards Bristol.

Still from Cassie onboard camera showing launch in heavy rain

Nice weather for ducks, but not for hedgehogs

A dusting of snow then brought it almost back to Earth in Severn Beach, where it hit a fence and disgorged some of its podules.

Snow gathering on the payload over Bristol

Lovely weather over Bristol

The payload hits a fence in Severn Beach

Crash bang wallop in Severn Beach

Having accidentally shed weight, the payload rose again to continue through further inclement weather and down to its final destination.

The payload covered in snow

I'll call you back - I'm a bit snowed under. The last image from the onboard camera

MARSBalloon - organised by Brit engineering outfit SEA in collaboration with the UK Space Agency - is designed to give schoolkids and uni students the chance "to test how everyday objects will survive on Mars".

The average temperature on the Red Planet is reckoned to be around -55°C, so that's pretty similar to what CASSiE will have endured during the flight. Mercifully for future explorers, though, no fences have as yet been spotted on the Martian surface. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Antarctic ice THICKER than first feared – penguin-bot boffins
Robo-sub scans freezing waters, rocks warming models
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Your PHONE is slowly KILLING YOU
Doctors find new Digitillnesses - 'text neck' and 'telepressure'
Reuse the Force, Luke: SpaceX's Elon Musk reveals X-WING designs
And a floating carrier for recyclable rockets
Britain's HUMAN DNA-strewing Moon mission rakes in £200k
3 days, and Kickstarter moves lander 37% nearer takeoff
Bond villains lament as Wicked Lasers withdraw death ray
Want to arm that shark? Better get in there quick
prev story

Whitepapers

Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.