Feeds

Would you hire a hacker to run your security? 'Yes' say Brit IT bosses

We don't have enough securo bods in the industry either, reckon gloomy BOFHs

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More than two in three IT professionals would consider ex-hackers for security roles, providing they have the right skills to do the job, a survey has found.

In addition, 40 per cent of respondents to CWJobs' survey of 352 IT bods reckoned there aren't enough skilled security professionals in the UK technology industry.

As if that news wasn't unsurprising enough, two thirds of the 352 tech professionals surveyed by website CWJobs stated that they would consider re-training in order to take on a role in IT security. Most respondents also believed that recruiting security professionals should be a priority in IT recruitment programmes.

Richard Nott, website director at CWJobs.co.uk, commented: “These findings present an interesting tactic for those keen to find new ways to meet the demand for security professionals within their organisations – though perhaps one that should be treated with some caution.”

Two thirds (70 per cent) of those surveyed stated that demand for professionals with security skills is growing, and specifically, 95 per cent believe that large organisations are in the greatest need.

The survey was released on Friday, days before the extension of a CESG-backed scheme to certify the competence and skills of cyber-security professionals working for the UK government to individuals working in the private sector.

The CCP certifications are valid for three years and provide a CESG-approved benchmark of skills, knowledge and expertise in cyber security. The whole scheme appears to be an attempt to regulate an industry where skills and experience have always counted for much more than qualifications.

If CWJobs' (admittedly limited) survey is to be believed, the market wants more skilled experts, whatever their background, and government certification isn't a requirement of industry – providing someone's around who can do the job. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
MI6 oversight report on Lee Rigby murder: US web giants offer 'safe haven for TERRORISM'
PM urged to 'prioritise issue' after Facebook hindsight find
I'll be back (and forward): Hollywood's time travel tribulations
Quick, call the Time Cops to sort out this paradox!
Assange™ slumps back on Ecuador's sofa after detention appeal binned
Swedish court rules there's 'great risk' WikiLeaker will dodge prosecution
NSA mass spying reform KILLED by US Senators
Democrats needed just TWO more votes to keep alive bill reining in some surveillance
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.