Feeds

Reg readers! You've got 100 MILLION QUID - what would you BLOW it on?

Because Ofcom wants to know what to do with its lolly

High performance access to file storage

Telecoms regulator Ofcom is drawing up its plans for 2014/15, and is looking for suggestions about how it might direct its considerable resources during the period.

Last year, those resources ran up a bill a shade over a hundred million pounds, some of which comes from radio spectrum licensing and fines but most of it came from UK taxpayers' pockets.

But in spending that money, the regulator has to keep smut off our TV screens (before 9pm at least), keep our airwaves clear for their rightful owners, monitor internet piracy, and oversee Blighty's post offices - not to mention launching an investigation every time someone thinks X Factor is fixed.

The day-to-day stuff eats most of the budget, but Ofcom is keen to hear about the more interesting stuff it should be addressing. There's no 4G auction to look forward to this time, but if we're really going to shift Freeview to clear the 700MHz band for faster mobile internet connections, then that needs to start happening. And there'll be much debate about the increasing role of White Space devices - gadgets that can use radio frequencies going spare in the local area.

The consultation [PDF, shorter than one would imagine] presents the 2013/14 plan of action, which draws to a close next March, and points out that the regulator has also had to cope with 190MHz of military spectrum that popped onto the market, the launch of Local TV stations (Grimsby goes live in November!) and BT's decision to enter the premium telly market.

Ofcom's remit remains centred around keeping the communications industry competitive and then relying on that competition to keep prices down. When it comes to radio frequencies, the watchdog is obliged to "secure the optimal use of spectrum" which increasingly means taking inspiration from the world's most utilised band - 2.4GHz - which is given away for nothing.

The consultation is open until 24 October, and the plan will be published in December. So if there's anything you think Ofcom should be doing, do let them know. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
Broadband Secretary of SHEEP sensationally quits Cabinet
Maria Miller finally resigns over expenses row
Skype pimps pro-level broadcast service
Playing Cat and Mouse with the media
Beat it, freetards! Dyn to shut down no-cost dynamic DNS next month
... but don't worry, charter members, you're still in 'for life'
Like Google, Comcast might roll its own mobile voice network
Says anything's possible if regulators approve merger with Time Warner
EE dismisses DATA-BURNING glitch with Orange Mail app
Bug quietly slurps PAYG credit - yet EE denies it exists
Turnbull leaves Australia's broadband blackspots in the dark
New Statement of Expectations to NBN Co offers get-out clauses for blackspot builds
Facebook claims 100 MEEELLION active users in India
Who needs China when you've got the next billion in your sights?
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.