Feeds

Reg readers! You've got 100 MILLION QUID - what would you BLOW it on?

Because Ofcom wants to know what to do with its lolly

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Telecoms regulator Ofcom is drawing up its plans for 2014/15, and is looking for suggestions about how it might direct its considerable resources during the period.

Last year, those resources ran up a bill a shade over a hundred million pounds, some of which comes from radio spectrum licensing and fines but most of it came from UK taxpayers' pockets.

But in spending that money, the regulator has to keep smut off our TV screens (before 9pm at least), keep our airwaves clear for their rightful owners, monitor internet piracy, and oversee Blighty's post offices - not to mention launching an investigation every time someone thinks X Factor is fixed.

The day-to-day stuff eats most of the budget, but Ofcom is keen to hear about the more interesting stuff it should be addressing. There's no 4G auction to look forward to this time, but if we're really going to shift Freeview to clear the 700MHz band for faster mobile internet connections, then that needs to start happening. And there'll be much debate about the increasing role of White Space devices - gadgets that can use radio frequencies going spare in the local area.

The consultation [PDF, shorter than one would imagine] presents the 2013/14 plan of action, which draws to a close next March, and points out that the regulator has also had to cope with 190MHz of military spectrum that popped onto the market, the launch of Local TV stations (Grimsby goes live in November!) and BT's decision to enter the premium telly market.

Ofcom's remit remains centred around keeping the communications industry competitive and then relying on that competition to keep prices down. When it comes to radio frequencies, the watchdog is obliged to "secure the optimal use of spectrum" which increasingly means taking inspiration from the world's most utilised band - 2.4GHz - which is given away for nothing.

The consultation is open until 24 October, and the plan will be published in December. So if there's anything you think Ofcom should be doing, do let them know. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters
Hundreds of emails flood inboxes thanks to gaffe
A black box for your SUITCASE: Now your lost luggage can phone home – quite literally
Breakfast in London, lunch in NYC, and your clothes in Peru
AT&T dangles gigabit broadband plans over 100 US cities
So soon after a mulled Google Fiber expansion, fancy that
AT&T threatens to pull out of FCC wireless auctions over purchase limits
Company wants ability to buy more spectrum space in auction
Google looks to LTE and Wi-Fi to help it lube YouTube tubes
Bandwidth hogger needs tube embiggenment if it's to succeed
Turnbull gave NBN Co NO RULES to plan blackspot upgrades
NBN Co faces huge future Telstra bills and reduces fibre footprint
NBN Co plans fibre-to-the-basement blitz to beat cherry-pickers
Heading off at the pass operation given same priority as blackspot fixing
NBN Co in 'broadband kit we tested worked' STUNNER
Announcement of VDSL trial is not proof of concept for fibre-to-the-node
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.