Feeds

French data cops to Google: RIGHT, you had your chance. PUNISHMENT time

Prepare yourself for fines, snarls CNIL

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Google has declined to make required changes to its privacy policy, France's privacy watchdog said today. The French data cops added that they will slap the ad giant with sanctions.

The Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertés (CNIL) - on behalf of the European Union's Article 29 Working Party - headed up an investigation of Google's controversial revision of its terms and conditions for netizens in March 2012.

In June this year Google was ordered to comply with authorities in France, after the CNIL ruled that the multibillion-dollar advertising corporation had breached the country's Data Protection Act, and ordered Mountain View to comply with the law or face sanctions.

At the same time, data cops in the UK, Spain, Germany, Italy, and the Netherlands also launched enforcement actions against Google setting similar deadlines for the company.

By July, Britain's data regulator (the ICO) - known for its lighter touch compared to its European counterparts when it comes to imposing fines - threatened Google with the "possibility of formal enforcement action" if it failed to tweak its privacy policy to make it "more informative".

Meanwhile, the French watchdog said today that "Google contests the reasoning of the CNIL and has not complied with the requests laid down in the enforcement notice [issued on 20 June]."

The data authorities in France had ordered Google to comply with its national law by defining specified and explicit purposes; to inform users about how it was processing their data; to define retention periods for the information it holds; to not proceed, without legal basis, with the "potentially unlimited combination of users' data"; to fairly slurp and mine passive users' data and get consent before storing cookies on their device.

But Google has declined and criticised French data protection legislation by claiming the law is not applicable to its online services.

"The Chair of the CNIL will now designate a rapporteur for the purpose of initiating a formal procedure for imposing sanctions, according to the provisions laid down in the French data protection law," the watchdog said.

At time of writing, neither the UK's Information Commissioner's Office nor Google had returned The Register's request for comment. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft
MS chases app deployment speeds already enjoyed by Linux devs
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
'Urika': Cray unveils new 1,500-core big data crunching monster
6TB of DRAM, 38TB of SSD flash and 120TB of disk storage
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
SDI wars: WTF is software defined infrastructure?
This time we play for ALL the marbles
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.