Feeds

Can't fit slab AND mobe in your tight pockets? 10 tablets with built-in 3G/4G

Fondle the web wherever you are without Wi-Fi or a clingy phone

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Asus FonePad

Reg Hardware retro numbers

Asus’ seven-inch cellular fondleslab is aimed firmly at the budget end of the market, hence the measly £180 price. Beyond that, Asus has been a bit clever by pitching the FonePad as a very cheap Android smartphone as much as an affordable tablet. That’s a reasonable enough punt too because, as I found out when testing it, 3D games aside the FonePad can do everything a first-generation Nexus 7 or a mid-range Android smartphone can do, but at a substantially reduced price. And the size itself is not quite the deal-breaking encumbrance (for a phone) you may think it to be.

Asus FonePad

Of course, with such a low price certain accommodations need to be made. The 1.2GHz Intel Z2420 Atom CPU is a little gutless and the PowerVR SGX540 graphics processor is pretty feeble, too. The cellular radio only supports 3G and you have to make do with single-band (2.4GHz) 802.11n Wi-Fi. There’s no main camera nor NFC pick-up either. Still, the 1280 x 800 IPS LCD screen is rather good and the whole caboodle feels well made and solid thanks to a Gorilla Glass front and a metal back. For the money, the FonePad is really not a bad box of tricks and could wrap all your smartphone and fondleslab needs up into one handy, affordable package.

Price £180
More Info Asus

Asus PadFone Infinity

Reg Hardware retro numbers

Winning by a country mile my award for the Best Idea of 2013, Asus’ PadFone 2 resolved the seemingly impossible contradiction of letting your tablet and phone share a cellular data connection with just one SIM card. How? By using the phone to drive the tablet. The PadFone Infinity is the much the same but better. Much, much better. Slide the Fone out of the Pad and you have a 4G Android smartphone with a five-inch, 1920 x 1080 display. Slide it back in and you have a tablet with a 10.1-inch, 1920 x 1200 display. Those numbers are rather alluring and both the phone and tablet screens are very nice IPS LCD affairs.

Asus PadFone Infinity

Since the phone packs a Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 chipset with a quad-core 1.7GHz Krait-class Snapdragon chip, 2GB of RAM and an Adreno 320 GPU, the PadFone goes like the blazes no matter which form you’re using it in. And thanks to a 2400mAh battery in the handset and a 5000mAh cell in the tablet, you won’t be forever hunting for a wall socket to cater for the 4G radio’s rapacious power demands. The only downside is that with the phone part of the equation now having a 5- rather than 4.7-inch screen, I’ll have to start calling it the PadVLFone.

Whatever. I still want one.

Price TBC
More Info Asus

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Next page: Dell Latitude 10

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Twitter: La la la, we have not heard of any NUDE JLaw, Upton SELFIES
If there are any on our site it is not our fault as we are not a PUBLISHER
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?