Feeds

CloudSigma lashes cloud to colocation partners

It's hybrid cloud, ma'am, but not as you know it

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

European infrastructure-as-a-service provider CloudSigma has followed in the steps of Amazon and Microsoft to offer a direct connection between private servers in colocation facilities and its cloud.

The "hybrid hosting" service was announced by the company on Wednesday, and will see it give customers the option of renting colocation servers in an Interxion facility in Zurich, the Switch SuperNAP in Las Vegas, and Equinix data centers around the world, then getting a direct line into its cloud as well.

Theoretically, this allows you to burst capacity into the pool of SSD-backed gear in CloudSigma's IaaS service, but spend most of your time chugging away on cheaper prepaid colocation servers.

The hybrid hosting service can give either a 1GbE or 10GbE private patch into the CloudSigma network, and customers can tap the cloud for DDoS protection systems, redundant routing, and external IP connectivity services. In addition, CloudSigma will offer customers a rebate on spending on its cloud of up to 20 percent of their private hosting costs.

This type of colo-public cloud approach was pioneered by Amazon Web Services with its DirectConnect tech, which launched in August 2011 and saw Bezos & Co. partner with Equinix. That was followed by Microsoft, which has teamed up with AT&T to offer a similar service starting in 2014.

This approach means customers can minimize their own on-premises gear, and can get the elasticity benefits of a cloud infrastructure, but with guaranteed control over important hardware in the colocation facilities as well.

CloudSigma is still rather small, though, with about 2PB of flash-backed storage capacity under management, so major customers may want to think twice lest they overwhelm the company's bit barns.

But the company does offer hope to admins with security worries about US intelligence agencies slurping data, because the company is actually two companies: one, CloudSigma Inc., is headquartered in Palo Alto, California, while CloudSigma AG is headquartered in Zurich, Switzerland. This legal and geographical partition between the regions may offer some security-conscious companies a scrap of hope, in their quest for an unfiddled-with third-party IT provider. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
The Return of BSOD: Does ANYONE trust Microsoft patches?
Sysadmins, you're either fighting fires or seen as incompetents now
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
Death by 1,000 cuts: Mainstream storage array suppliers are bleeding
Cloud, all-flash kit, object storage slicing away at titans of storage
Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7
New chip scales to 1024 cores, 8192 threads 64 TB RAM, at speeds over 3.6GHz
VMware vaporises vCHS hybrid cloud service
AnD yEt mOre cRazy cAps to dEal wIth
El Reg's virtualisation desk pulls out the VMworld crystal ball
MARVIN musings and other Gelsinger Gang guessing games
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
BYOD's dark side: Data protection
An endpoint data protection solution that adds value to the user and the organization so it can protect itself from data loss as well as leverage corporate data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?