Feeds

Brits are world's most wired drivers, says fleet tracker CEO

Now the for the bad news: the roads are so bad you can't do logistics without fleet trackers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The United Kingdom's roads are so bad that the nation has become the world's strongest adopter of fleet management technology, says to TJ Chung, CEO of logisitics software-as-a-service (SaaS) outfit Navman Wireless.

Navman Wireless carved itself out of parent company Navman, which specialises in hardware. The spin out is more interesed in SaaS and plumbing vehicles innards into sensors in order to capture information about fuel consumption, braking habits and many more metrics that when properly understood can be used to direct drivers into safer and cheaper driving.

Speaking to The Reg in Sydney today, Chung said one 500km motorway journey is much the same as any other in any country. That means figuring out how to cut logistics costs can be easy in places like Australia and the USA where motorways are plentiful and lesser roads were built from scratch to carry powered vehicles. The UK's often-narrow and winding roads, plus a distributed population, present a more complex challenge that local logistics outfits quickly find can only be addressed with more and more frequent analysis of driving data.

“Roads in the UK are not as consistent,” Chung said. “Minor roads are very hard to drive on.”

The pain UK motorists feel is Chung's gain: he says around 25 per cent of UK logistics companies use the kind of service Navman Wireless offers. “The UK is the most advanced adopter,” he said.

China is, inevitably, a market he feels will surge in future. Before it can do so, the cost of chipsets to power devices using the the Middle Kingdom's GPS alternative Beidou needs to come down. “GPS chips are now less than $US3,” Chung said. “Beidou chipsets are $US25.”

Chung also dismissed Europe's Galileo as irrelevant to the evolution of his industry, saying it replicates GPS but is yet to prove itself more accurate. Lack of coverage is also an issue that makes it unimportant at present, a status he expects will remain given projected Galileo satellite launch schedule. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
Return of the Jedi – Apache reclaims web server crown
.london, .hamburg and .公司 - that's .com in Chinese - storm the web server charts
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
Torvalds CONFESSES: 'I'm pretty good at alienating devs'
Admits to 'a metric ****load' of mistakes during work with Linux collaborators
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.