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'Honker Union' sniffs 270 hacktivism targets

Chinese group to mark Manchurian Incident with cyber nationalism raids

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Infamous Chinese hacktivist group Honker Union has shortlisted a whopping 270 Japanese targets for attack today - the anniversary of the Manchurian Incident, which was the precursor to the Japanese invasion of China.

The group singled out Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Prime Minister’s Office and other ministries, agencies, local government and media organisations on a bulletin board notice seen by NHK.

The Chinese hacktivists have previous when it comes to launching online attacks against Japanese targets.

Around the same time last year, they launched DDoS attacks on at least 19 government sites including the Defence ministry and Internal Affairs and Communications ministry, and defaced others – including the web site of the Supreme Court – with the Chinese flag.

Around 300 sites were shortlisted last year with over 4,000 individuals posting messages about planned attacks on Chinese chat site YY.

Although last year’s September 18th anniversary had even more impact as Tokyo had just purchased the disputed Senkaku islands, much to China’s anger, the date remains a contentious one between the two countries.

The Manuchrian, or Mukden, Incident of 18 September 1931 saw Japan attempt to blow up a railway line it owned near Mukden in northern China.

The Imperial army then used the incident as an excuse to invade and occupy the region, leading to widespread international condemnation and Japan's withdrawal from the League of Nations.

Chinese hacktivists aren’t only focusing their ire outwards, however.

It emerged this week that some cyber miscreants had hacked the local government web site of Shaoxing, Zhejiang province, and defaced it with screenshots of traditional Mooncakes depicted anti-Communist Party slogans.

Mooncakes are commonly eaten during the mid-Autumn festival in China, usually with a message of “longevity” and “harmony” baked into the top.

However, these cakes apparently had the rather more controversial: “Bite to Death the CCP”, “Overthrow CCP”, “Bitterly Hate CCP”, and “Get Lost, CCP”. ®

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