Feeds

Anti-drone bods haul MoD to court over SECRET KILLER ROBOTS

Campaigners on mission to expose data on UK drone strikes in Afghanistan

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The Ministry of Defence is set to face a court hearing next week over its refusal to release information about Britain's lethal unmanned drone missions in Afghanistan.

It will appear in front of the Information Tribunal on 23 and 24 September in a bid to defend its decision to throw a veil of secrecy around the use of drones in combat.

Campaigners from Drone Wars UK have been using Freedom of Information legislation to tease out details of the UK's use of unmanned combat vehicles on the battlefield.

But the MoD refused to answer two questions which asked for the exact date and location of each drone attack, as well as details of whether how many times the Reaper drones fired weapons during both unplanned, reactive combat and scheduled operations.

The department said its refusal was based on the grounds that it would affect the "capability, effectiveness or security" of the armed forces and harm "relations between the UK and another State".

The campaigners launched an appeal with the Information Commissioner's Office, but were again knocked back when the Commissioner backed the MoD on both decisions, saying the release of the sensitive information would harm national security.

The next stage is a tribunal in the General Regulatory Chamber, which hears appeals against decisions of government regulators including the ICO.

Chris Cole, Drone Wars UK Co-ordinator, said: “The growing use of armed unmanned drones is a matter of serious public interest both here in the UK and around the world. In order to answer the many legal and ethical questions raised by such systems, a proper understanding of how they are being used on a day-to-day basis is needed and it is right that the public have access to such information.”

The hearing will be held in Court Room One at HMRC Tribunal Courts from 10am, although it is closed to the public. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Arab States make play for greater government control of the internet
Nerds told to get lost in last-minute power grab bid at UN meeting
Zippy one-liners, broken promises: Doctor Who on the Orient Express
Series finally hits stride, but Clara's U-turn is baffling
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.