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Speaking in Tech: 'I'm not a pimp just because I wear a fedora'

Plus: 'If your biz is aligned with Microsoft, why change?'

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speaking_in_tech Greg Knieriemen podcast enterprise

It's another episode of El Reg's weekly Wednesday tech news cast, giving you the run-down on everything worth knowing about in the enterprise and consumer tech world this week. This week, co-hosts Greg Knieriemen and Sarah Vela are slacking off while Ed Saipetch flies solo at CloudBeat in San Francisco, CA.

Our special guests are Justin Pirie, cloud strategist at Mimecast, Dave McCrory, SVP of DSP (Platform) Engineering at Warner Music Group and Ben Kepes, well-known technology evangelist, investor, commentator and business adviser.

Dave is apparently wearing a fedora (one of two - he has a black one and a grey one), which the ever-sharp Eddie picks up on. Defending himself, Dave says: "A lot of the techies like it, and a few of the people on the street find it to be of interest as well. Including one gentleman who asked me if I was a pimp... I am not a pimp of any kind."

Meanwhile, the guys chew the fat over APIs, taking a swipe at Amazon and heaping praise on its rivals. One of the panel (hey, we're not going to tell you who - listen to the podcast and find out!) lays into vendors' fascination with portability, pointing out that data centres don't tend to move all that often.

He adds: "Maybe your costs are distributed amongst your tenants ... but I'm going to argue you'll have a pretty decent rate of utilisation [for your own hardware] if you're a medium or large enterprise."

This week we discuss:

  • Dave's Fedora
  • Not just talking cloud, doing cloud
  • More AWS API whining
  • Ugly babies
  • Judging clouds
  • On prem, off prem consistency and vCHS
  • Portability is over-rated
  • Service distinction
  • Jevons paradox in IT
  • The cloud keys: Compliance, management and security

Listen with the Reg player below, or download here.

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