Feeds

Oracle ships Java 8 Developer Preview for testing, 18 months late

Only six months more to go (fingers crossed)

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Oracle has shipped the Developer Preview of the much-delayed Java Development Kit (JDK) Version 8, the reference implementation of the Java SE 8 Platform.

"If you've been watching JDK 8 evolve from afar then now is an excellent time to download a build and try it out – the sooner the better!" Oracle's chief Java architect Mark Reinhold said in a blog post announcing the release.

This latest testing milestone has been a long time coming. Oracle originally expected to ship JDK 8 in late 2012, but internal debate among Java Community Process members led to repeated delays. As it stands now, JDK 8 won't reach general availability until March 2014.

Along the way, Java SE 8 lost support for Project Jigsaw, a major new set of features that would have added a standard module system to the Java platform. Project Jigsaw was originally planned for Java SE 7, but now it won't appear until Java SE 9 ships in early 2016 (or that's the idea, anyway).

That leaves Project Lambda, an effort to make it easier to write Java code for multicore processors by adding programming constructs called "closures" to the Java language, as the only major driving feature for the JDK 8 release – and even Project Lambda was meant to ship with JDK 7.

There are a few other new features in JDK 8, of course. Among them are revamped Date and Time APIs, improvements to the Java Virtual Machine (JVM), and the Nashorn JavaScript engine, among others – but these are mostly minor. A full list can be found here.

The most important thing for now, however, is that developers download the Developer Preview of JDK 8, bang on it, and report any problems. It's available for Linux, OS X, Solaris, and Windows in 32-bit and 64-bit versions, plus a 32-bit version for Linux running on ARM.

"Let us know if your existing code doesn't compile and run correctly on JDK 8, if it runs slower than before, if it crashes the JVM, or if there are any remaining design issues in the new language and API features," Reinhold wrote.

The Developer Preview is the second-to-last milestone release before JDK 8 reaches general availability. As the schedule stands now, one or more release-candidate builds will ship between now and January 23, 2014. If nothing goes woefully wrong with any of those, the final version of the kit should be ready for production use on March 18, 2014. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft WINDOWS 10: Seven ATE Nine. Or Eight did really
Windows NEIN skipped, tech preview due out on Wednesday
Business is back, baby! Hasta la VISTA, Win 8... Oh, yeah, Windows 9
Forget touchscreen millennials, Microsoft goes for mouse crowd
Apple: SO sorry for the iOS 8.0.1 UPDATE BUNGLE HORROR
Apple kills 'upgrade'. Hey, Microsoft. You sure you want to be like these guys?
ARM gives Internet of Things a piece of its mind – the Cortex-M7
32-bit core packs some DSP for VIP IoT CPU LOL
Microsoft on the Threshold of a new name for Windows next week
Rebranded OS reportedly set to be flung open by Redmond
Lotus Notes inventor Ozzie invents app to talk to people on your phone
Imagine that. Startup floats with voice collab app for Win iPhone
'Google is NOT the gatekeeper to the web, as some claim'
Plus: 'Pretty sure iOS 8.0.2 will just turn the iPhone into a fax machine'
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.