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Pair of complete tits sorry for pervy app

'Titstare' developers post apology for disrupting disruption-fest

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The developers behind an app called 'Titstare' have apologised for any and all offences caused by the software.

Titstare went viral yesterday, in the worst possible way, after it was demonstrated at Tech Crunch's Disrupt conference. The app's functionality, such as it is, offers users the chance to take photos of themselves gawking at women's breasts. The two Australian coders behind the app hammed it up during their one-minute presentation, generating a few blokey guffaws at the event.

Online reaction to their presentation quickly condemned the app as sexist. Once it was discovered children were present during the demo things snowballed.

The two chaps who demoed the app, Jethro Batts and David Boulton, have form with online silliness having previously launched a service called “Hate You Cards” that offers customised abusive postcards. That app got the pair into strife with Australian politicians.

The Hate You Cards Twitter account was yesterday used to issue an apology of sorts yesterday, as you can see below.

Online outrage has since escalated to the point at which those behind Titstare have issued a more comprehensive apology on Facebook.

The apology offers the following explanation for the demo:

“Unfortunately, our initial idea did not evolve in time, so we felt our last minute mock-up was our only option to present, and there was never any intention to bring this idea to fruition.”

The pair go on to write that they are “currently working on legitimate startups” and that “These projects include female co-founders and a number of highly talented women in the teams. “We never had any malicious intent, and we take full responsibility for our thoughtless actions.”

“It is important for us that people know we are not associated with any continuation of this idea," the post concludes. ®

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