Feeds

New online banking Trojan empties users' wallets, videos privates

Don't fall for the old .pdf.exe wheeze

The essential guide to IT transformation

Bank account-raiding Trojan Hesperbot has infected computers in UK, Turkey, the Czech Republic and Portugal, The Register has learned.

Net security firm Eset said the software nasty is distributed via rather convincing-looking emails, which are dressed up as legit package tracking documents from postal companies or correspondence from an internet provider and other outfits.

These messages try to trick marks into downloading and running a malicious Windows executable, cunningly named with a .pdf.exe file extension.

Once installed, Hesperbot can silently snoop on passwords by logging a user's keystrokes, take screenshots, record from a video camera if one is connected, intercept network traffic, and pipe all this snaffled data to the crooks' command server. The Trojan can also set up a hidden VNC service, allowing miscreants to remotely log in and take control of the computer.

Armed with this information, crooks can try to log into victims' online bank accounts to siphon off their cash.

And on top of that, marks are persuaded to install software on their Symbian, Blackberry or Android phone, which is the mobile malware component of Hesperbot.

It's estimated hundreds people have fallen for the scam in Turkey, and dozens in each of the Czech Republic, Portugal, the United Kingdom.

“Analysis of the threat revealed that we were dealing with a banking trojan, with similar functionality and identical goals to the infamous Zeus and SpyEye, but significant implementation differences indicated that this is a new malware family, not a variant of a previously known trojan,” said Robert Lipovsky, ESET malware researcher who leads the team analysing the malware.

More details can be found in a report here. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Germany 'accidentally' snooped on John Kerry and Hillary Clinton
Dragnet surveillance picks up EVERYTHING, USA, m'kay?
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.