Feeds

Amazon hits back at Microsoft with Redis ElastiCache

Bezos & Co enlist Memcached's younger, smarter brother in cloud war

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Amazon has broadened its set of services for storing frequently accessed data, just one day after Microsoft announced a competing product.

The upgrade to the Amazon Web Services ElastiCache was announced by Amazon on Wednesday, and see Bezos & Co make Redis a caching option for the previously Memcached-only tech.

Redis is a rival technology to Memcached, and its development is sponsored by VMware's cloud spin-off Pivotal. The datastore was first released in 2009 and has been in constant development since then. It is used by companies like Twitter, Blizzard, StackOverflow, and The Guardian.

Redis is an in-memory key-value "NoSQL" datastore that has transactions with optimistic locking, and more supported datatypes than Memcached. Key values can contain strings, along with hashes, lists, sets, and sorted sets. Due to these features, Redis is more flexible than Memcached which is somewhat brittle to use, though the technology is perhaps not quite as mature as its forebear, which has been in development since 2003.

The enhancement is a fully managed Redis caching service that starts at $0.022 per hour. It has support for replication of data across multiple availability zones, and developers already running Redis on an elastic compute cloud (EC2) server can migrate the data into the new service.

The announcement of Redis for ElasticCache follows Microsoft launching the Windows Azure Cache Service in preview mode on Tuesday. Unlike ElastiCache, Preview Mode allows customers to automatically scale up their caches across a greater amount of storage than Amazon, before needing to manually add more nodes.

But for now Azure's standalone service does not have a Redis option, though it is possible to run the software on a CentOS Linux virtual machine, but this requires more administration and fiddling than the as-a-service variant being offered by Amazon. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
Stop the IoT revolution! We need to figure out packet sizes first
Researchers test 802.15.4 and find we know nuh-think! about large scale sensor network ops
Turnbull should spare us all airline-magazine-grade cloud hype
Box-hugger is not a dirty word, Minister. Box-huggers make the cloud WORK
SanDisk vows: We'll have a 16TB SSD WHOPPER by 2016
Flash WORM has a serious use for archived photos and videos
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.