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Red Hat mints OpenStack certification

Helps devs turn open source project into CV-filling bulletpoint

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Red Hat is getting into the business of OpenStack certification as the open source company tries to co-opt some of the enthusiasm for the cloud platform and turn it into cash.

The Red Hat Certificate of Expertise in Infrastructure-as-a-Service was announced by the company on Monday, and sees the disciples of the red fedora offer classes around general OpenStack components as well as Red Hat's own OpenStack distro.

"As interest in OpenStack grows, enterprise customers require experienced IT professionals who can deploy and manage OpenStack. This new class and certification aims to meet this demand by representing the industry's highest standard for OpenStack-based training certifications and enabling participants to gain a growing knowledge of the changes happening in the IaaS space," the company wrote in a press release announcing the certification.

Our translation: there's a real market for people with OpenStack skills, and having this on your CV might help negotiate a raise or get a tasty cloud wrangling job.

The OpenStack certification could be a nice moneyspinner for Red Hat, as it costs $600 for two hours of live evaluation. The company says the certificate will demonstrate that users can install and configure Red Hat's OpenStack distro, can manager users, projects and rules, configure and manage images, add compute nodes, and manage storage using OpenStack's "Swift" and "Cinder" systems.

The launch of the certification follows Amazon Web Services announcing a wide-ranging training and evaluation program for its cloud in April this year. Amazon's global certification program offers a $150 "AWS Certified Solutions Architect – Associate Level" and Amazon plans to announce further courses later in the year. As with the rest of the cloud, Bezos & Co are undercutting the competition on price. ®

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