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IBM lands spook data-sharing standard at Oz airports

Airline passenger data and 'other relevant material' checked in 'real time'

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The Australian Customs and Border Protection Service (ACBPS) has gone live with IBM-delivered passenger analytics which it says will help identify risky passengers before they enter Australia.

In a rather coy canned statement, Big Blue says the system will check Passenger Name Records (PNRs) against “other relevant material” to provide an on-the-spot risk assessment of individual arrivals. With around 30 million airline passenger arrivals annually, speeding up arrival assessments is a priority for the ACBPS.

“The solution eliminates the manual and time consuming process of pulling data from multiple host systems on an “as required” basis. Now ACBPS officials receive real-time data for all departures and arrivals, allowing them to more quickly and accurately zero in on potentially high risk passengers”, IBM claims.

The new system also brings ACBPS in line with the new global PNRGOV standard, used as the basis of information sharing between governments and airlines. While PNRGOV is a global standard, Australia is only the second country behind Canada to get its implementation live.

IBM emphasises that the system is compliant with Australia's Privacy Act, as well as the Customs Act and “provisions of the European Union-Australia PNR Agreement”. ®

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