Feeds

Amazon tells mobe devs: Bring your app-strokers to us, we'll look after you

6% of sales sound good? You don't need slip-ons to be an associate

New hybrid storage solutions

Amazon will kick back six per cent of sales to developers selling real products within their mobile apps, as the online retailer extends the Associate programme already used by websites.

Amazon Associates pays commission to sites which direct shoppers to the online behemoth's site. In 2008 a report from Stanford University reckoned 40 per cent of Amazon's sales were coming though its Associates, so replicating that model in mobile isn't just sensible, it's probably essential, and (perhaps more importantly) something Google can't do.

The idea is to sell products related to the application being used, and apps can link to specific products or an Amazon category. So a football game could sell football kit, a weather app could sell umbrellas, and a game could sell action figures of its cast.

Showing a little humility, Amazon's Mike Hines suggests that the world-renowned Three Wolf Moon T-shirt could be offered for sale at the end of a game which required the player to best Cerberus.

More worrying perhaps is the ability to link the purchase of physical products to app functionality. It's a development which should strike fear into the hearts of parents everywhere – the system was tested with Skylanders Cloud Patrol.

For the child-free: Skylanders is a console game which requires the purchase of overpriced plastic figures to play. The figures contain RFID tags allowing the character to appear in the game (the tag being read by the supplied Portal Of Power), and parts of the game can only be unlocked by specific characters – thus necessitating the purchase of more plastic.

The model has proved very successful: the next Pokemon game uses the Wii U's inbuilt NFC reader to achieve the same thing, and Disney's Infinity platform (launched last week) extends the idea across its own brands.

Amazon is offering the same thing, so developers could choose to lock parts of applications until the requisite toy is purchased. There's no Portal of Power, so at least you can buy the toy (to get the in-game character) and then flog it on eBay immediately afterwards, assuming you can prize it out of the child's hands without injury to the child, toy, or yourself. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.