Feeds

Hacktivists boast of English Defence League KO after website downed

Anonymous-affiliated bods claim fresh scalp of far-right group

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Hacktivists linked to Anonymous have claimed responsibility for knocking shouty anti-Islam group the English Defence League's website offline.

The EDL is a far-right street protest movement whose official stance is an objection to the "spread of Sharia law and Islamic extremism in the UK". Its numerous critics argue the league are just a bunch of xenophobic football hooligans, and their numerous protests often involve violence and arrests.

The group's official website (http://englishdefenceleague.org) was taken offline on Tuesday and a Pakistani hacking crew affiliated with Anonymous claimed responsibility for the hack.

The website remains unavailable at the time of writing on Thursday morning, with a notice stating that the website is unavailable. "We are currently fixing an issue with our server and will restore services as soon as possible," a notice from the EDL Web Division explains.

Hacktivists affiliated with Anonymous have locked horns with the EDL on several previous occasions. For example, in May, the hacktivist group leaked names and addresses of more than 200 supposed members of the controversial protest group, as well as the mobile phone numbers of its leaders.

The leak was the first salvo in ‪#OpEDL‬, aimed at bringing down the group, which hacktivists accuse of attempting to hijack public revulsion about the horrific murder of soldier Lee Rigby in south London three months ago to further the group's own political agenda. The EDL's leader, Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, was yesterday charged with obstructing police after allegedly trying to defy a ban on marching past a mosque in Woolwich in June.

The latest hack was also carried out under the banner of ‪#OpEDL‬ and carried out by members of the ZHC (ZCompany Hacking Crew) from Pakistan, apparently supported by elements of the wider Anonymous hacktivist collective. ZHC accompanied the hack with the leak of around 40 names and mobile phone numbers of supposed EDL members.

It's unclear whether the leaked list, uploaded to Pastebin, is genuine or represents new information. Very little has been heard of ‪#OpEDL‬ after an initial flurry of activity in late May, until this week's shenanigans.

The ZHC member behind the latest hack, @Guy_Victory, has been taunting the EDL about its inability to get its site back up and running.

"EDL still cant fix site from #ZHC hacked it yesterday id call that a K.O :)," the hacktivist said in a Twitter update.

ZHC claims to have lifted personal information, including but perhaps not limited to email addresses, after breaking into the EDL's official website in an earlier assault last November.

Research outfit Netcraft reports the englishdefenceleague.org website, which runs on Linux, began using protection services from CloudFlare earlier this month. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.