Feeds

FoundationDB ACID-lovers price up NoSQL database

Unorthodox tech gets free and paid-for versions

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

NoSQL database startup FoundationDB has made its ACID-compliant tech generally available, after an extended beta that has seen over 2,000 people try out the company's unorthodox database.

The FoundationDB database is a key-value store that also allows for different data models – such as JSON documents, graphs, and SQL (via technology from recently acquired Akiban) – to live on top of the NoSQL system.

It claims to be both ACID-compliant – a database term meaning it supports transactions that have Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation, and Durability – while having the inherent scale-out capabilities of a NoSQL system. This claim has been met with skepticism and curiosity by the database community, as attaining both capabilities is assumed to be very, very tricky.

On Tuesday, the company announced its tech was generally available, priced up a commercial version, and also launched a free offer as it sought to generate enthusiasm and cash for its novel approach to data management and manipulation.

The free "Community Edition" offers the performance and capabilities of the paid-for version but limits deployment to clusters of up to 6 processes per month.

"A FoundationDB process is a single worker process you run on a computer," Rosenthal says. "It utilizes a single core of processing power but can use all the network capacity of the card, all the IO capacity of the hard disk."

The community version "will be available to use without giving us an email address," Rosenthal said, which may relieve devs deluged by pitch emails.

For the commercial version, the starting price is $99 per process, per month with 8-5 support, going up to $199 per process, per month for the platinum offering, which offers "concierge" support and a guaranteed response time of 2 hours or less.

Known limitations of the system include a transaction limit of 10,000,000 bytes, key size limit of 10,000 bytes, and value limit of 100,000 bytes. For the time being, the tech also has trouble dealing with clusters of more than 96 cores, and the company is not quite sure what will happen when the database goes over 100TB in size. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Sway: Microsoft's new Office app doesn't have an Undo function
Content aggregation, meet the workplace ... oh
Do Moan! MONSTER 6-day EMAIL OUTAGE hits Domain Monster
Customers freaked out by frightful service
Sign off my IT project or I’ll PHONE your MUM
Honestly, it’s a piece of piss
Return of the Jedi – Apache reclaims web server crown
.london, .hamburg and .公司 - that's .com in Chinese - storm the web server charts
NetWare sales revive in China thanks to that man Snowden
If it ain't Microsoft, it's in fashion behind the Great Firewall
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.