Feeds

Brits: We can STOP TROLLS if we know where they LIVE - poll

We didn't mean US... Hand over OUR addresses? Not bloody likely

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The Great British Public want an end to anonymous registration for social media accounts in the aftermath of high-profile online abuse cases, pollsters have claimed – and the older and more conservative they are, the more likely they are to want it.

A YouGov survey found that 72 per cent of the British public want social media sites to demand the the names and addresses of users.

The poll purveyors quizzed about 1,900 adults and asked them: "Would you support or oppose social media sites like Twitter only allowing people to use them if they provided a full verified name and address?"

Just 14 per cent were opposed to this suggestion, while a further 14 per cent didn't know. Although, if the respondents were being honest, we would suggest this number might be far higher.

Opposition to anonymous registration grew with age, with just 54 per cent of young 'uns aged 18 to 24 in favour of stricter social media identification rules, compared to 82 per cent of people aged 60 and over.

People intending to vote Tory at the next election were stricter on identifying trolls than Labour voters, on 80 per cent versus 75 per cent, while sandal-wearing Lib Dems were the woolliest, with just 63 per cent of them demanding names and addresses in exchange for social media accounts.

Supporters of the UK Independence Party were slightly more likely than Conservatives to call for tougher registration rules, at 81 per cent.

London was the most liberal on anonymous sign-ups, followed by Scotland, while the "rest of the south" was the strictest.

A few weeks ago, most of the British public probably wouldn't have cared about anonymous social media registration. But since feminist campaigner Caroline Criado-Perez and Labour MP Stella Creasy came under attack from vile, rape-threatening trolls, suddenly everyone's an expert.

And yes, we know that what the media calls a troll isn't actually what the internet has always called a troll. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
Lawyers mobilise angry mob against Apple over alleged 2011 Macbook Pro crapness
We suffered 'random bouts of graphical distortion' - fanbois
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
US court SHUTS DOWN 'scammers posing as Microsoft, Facebook support staff'
Netizens allegedly duped into paying for bogus tech advice
Feds seek potential 'second Snowden' gov doc leaker – report
Hang on, Ed wasn't here when we compiled THIS document
Verizon bankrolls tech news site, bans tech's biggest stories
No agenda here. Just don't ever mention Net neutrality or spying, ok?
Inside the EYE of the TORnado: From Navy spooks to Silk Road
It's hard enough to peel the onion, are you hard enough to eat the core?
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
Internet Security Threat Report 2014
An overview and analysis of the year in global threat activity: identify, analyze, and provide commentary on emerging trends in the dynamic threat landscape.