Feeds

NORKS prepping glorious People's Smartmobe

'Arirang' expected to "instill national pride and self-respect" into the Korean people'

The Power of One Infographic

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has visited a mobile phone factory in the reclusive nation and revealed some details of a handset dubbed the “Arirang”.

The Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) isn't the kind of source to go heavy on tech specs and its English isn't the best, so we don't know just what the phone runs but is widely held to be Chinese hardware running a Middle Kingdom take on Android shorn of Googley bits. The factory is thought to be an assembly plant, rather than a high-tech centre capable of doing the heavy lifting involved in phone manufacture.

KCNA's propagandastory about the first secretary of the Workers' Party of Korea, first chairman of the National Defence Commission of the DPRK and supreme commander of the Korean People's Army's (for such is Kim's full title) visit to the factory described the handset as possessing the following features:

  • ”An application program in Korean style which provides the best convenience to the users while strictly guaranteeing security”
  • ”Convenient for its user when that part of the phone is sensitive”
  • ”Their camera function has high pixels”

That Kim's tour of the factory was a stage-managed propagation of party diktat is beyond doubt. Kim putting on his socks gets more or less the same treatment.

But the statement also includes a paragraph to the effect that Kim feels "mass-production of goods with DPRK trademark can instill national pride and self-respect into the Korean people.”

Kim goes on to say "How nice to see hand phones being successfully produced with indigenous technology, he said, adding it is of educational significance in making people love Korean things.”

Sure, that's propaganda. But Vulture South wonders if readers share our feeling that the sentiments are eerily close to those voiced by Apple when it talks about building more kit in the USA? ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
NEW Raspberry Pi B+, NOW with - count them - FOUR USB ports
Composite vid socket binned as GPIO sprouts new pins
Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad
Apple's fondleslab is the tablet dermatitis sufferers won't want to take
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
Seventh-gen SPARC silicon will accelerate Oracle databases
Uncle Larry's mutually-optimised stack to become clearer in August
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.