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New blinged-up 'iPhone 5S' touted by Jobs FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE

'Champagne gold' encased mobe rumoured for September unwrap

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The next-generation iPhone, one of the last devices conceived by Apple godhead Steve Jobs before his death, will hit the shelves on 10 September, according to fresh rumours.

The new spin of the iOS smartphone, expected to be called the 5S, could sport a gaudy "champagne gold" coloured case, as well as the usual white or black, Japanese Apple site Macotakara claimed.

Even though Jobs shuffled off this mortal coil almost two years ago, Apple has continued to release new iStuff devised by the billionaire baron during his gilded reign. According to the tech titan's government liaison Michael Foulkes, Jobs oversaw the design of two models of iPhone to go on sale after his death.

The new 5S is not only rumoured to be equipped with a fingerprint sensor, but it could have a protruding shape familiar to anyone blessed with an "outy" belly button.

Ming-Chi Kuo, an analyst with KGI Securities, claimed this convex button could be made of sapphire, a scratch-proof material already used to cover the lens of the iPhone 5.

He said: "Convex home button creates space for fingerprint sensor; yield to improve. We think that a fingerprint sensor will be placed under the home button of iPhone 5S. However, assembling it could be difficult as the space under home button is limited as it already has to accommodate the Lightning connector, speaker and microphone. Thus, we think the shape of the home button could be changed from concave to convex to create more space for a fingerprint sensor.

"Sapphire prevents home button from being scratched. A convex home button could be more easily scratched, so a harder material is required. We believe Apple will switch from plastic to sapphire, whose hardness is second only to diamond. Sapphire would protect the home button from being scratched and the fingerprint sensor from being damaged."

A cheaper plastic model is also expected to be touted at the same time as the new flagship mobe. Designed with an eye on emerging markets, the fruity firm hopes it will convert a new generation of cost-conscious fanbois and gurlz, it is believed.

Apple has already unveiled iOS 7, which features a spooky system for tracking punters' every footstep. It also features a new "flat" design scheme that replaces the skeuomorphism of the good old days with brightly coloured icons resembling the outfits of popstar Nicki Minaj.

Of course, just like no one truly knows the mind of God, it's impossible to truly predict what plans Steve Jobs will roll out from beyond the grave. We know that usual Apple refresh schedule should see a new iPhone, iMac and Macbook Pro released later this year. But with shareholders concerned that the fruity firm has stopped innovating, the second coming of Steve Jobs might not be able to stave off a decline following Peak Apple. ®

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